The Social Production of Indifference

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University of Chicago Press, 1993 - Business & Economics - 207 pages
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Herzfeld argues that "modern" bureaucratically regulated societies are no more "rational" or less "symbolic" than the societies traditionally studied by anthropologists. He suggests that we cannot understand national bureaucracies divorced from local-level ideas about chance, personal character, social relationships and responsibility.

"Herzfeld's book is extremely ambitious and will be of interest to any anthropologist concerned with the study of bureaucracy, organizational and institutional control, symbols and their power, and social conflict. . . . Thoughtful and challenging."—Helen B. Schwartzman, American Ethnologist
 

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Contents

The Social Production of Indifference
3
One World or Two?
19
The Roots of Indifference
50
The Creativity of Stereotypes
73
The Language Fetish
100
Retrospective Fatalities
129
Declassifications
160
REFERENCES
187
INDEX
201
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About the author (1993)

Michael Herzfeld is the Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University and has taught at several other universities worldwide. He is the author of many books.

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