The source, chemistry and use of food products

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P. Blakiston's son & co., 1914 - Cooking - 517 pages
 

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Page 425 - All substances made of milk or skimmed milk, with the admixture of butter, animal oils or fats, vegetable or any other oils, or compounds foreign to such milk, and made in imitation or semblance of cheese.
Page 219 - Preserve^ is the sound product made from clean, sound, properly matured and prepared fresh fruit and sugar (sucrose) sirup, with or without spices or vinegar, and conforms in name to that of the fruit used, and in its preparation not less than forty-five (45) pounds of fruit are used to each fifty-five (55) pounds of sugar.
Page 131 - Honey is the nectar and saccharine exudations of plants gathered, modified, and stored in the comb by honey bees (Apis mellifica and A.
Page 219 - Jam, marmalade; is the sound product made from clean, sound, properly matured and prepared fresh fruit and sugar (sucrose), with or without spices or vinegar, by boiling to a pulpy or semisolid consistence, and conforms in name to the fruit used, and in its preparation not less than forty-five (45) pounds of fruit are used to each fifty-five (55) pounds of sugar. 9. Glucose jam, glucose marmalade is jam in which a glucose product is used in place of sugar (sucrose).
Page 226 - As far as digestibility is concerned 80 per cent. of the protein, 90 per cent. of the fat, and 95 per cent. of the carbohydrates are digested, thus comparing favorably with the digestibility of vegetables.
Page 30 - Flour, wheat flour, white flour, is the fine-ground product obtained in the commercial milling of wheat, and consists essentially of the starch and gluten of the endosperm. It contains not more than 15 per cent of moisture, not less than 1 per cent of nitrogen, not more than 1 per cent of ash, and not more than 0.5 per cent of fiber.
Page 442 - Oil of peppermint occurs as a colorless liquid, with the characteristic peppermint odor and a strongly aromatic, pungent taste, followed by a sensation of cold when air is drawn into the mouth.
Page 17 - ... conditions yields glucose and galactose. Cane sugar (sucrose or saccharose) is by far the most important of these sugars. (See p. 101.) It is found in the juice and •sap of certain plants, and is an important constituent of fruits. When heated it yields barley sugar and later caramel. One part of sugar is soluble in 0.46 parts of water at 77 F., and in 0.2 parts of boiling water.1 Malt sugar (maltose) is formed in the process of malting cereals, and is an intermediate product when starch...
Page 280 - The finest banana flour called "bananose, " at the end of one and one-half hours of pancreatic digestion, was capable of developing twice as much sugar as the same quantity of oatmeal or farina, and approximately one and one-half times as much sugar as cornstarch. Saliva when substituted for pancreatic extract produces a similar effect. Banana flour is made into a thin gruel or porridge by the addition of either water or milk, and eaten with cream it constitutes a delicious and highly nutritious...
Page 301 - ... time, the final result of cooking is that stewed mushrooms contain only about 2 per cent. of solid matter.1 Mushrooms are not readily digested in the stomach. This may be partly due to the peculiar character of the cellulose, which seems to become somewhat coagulated and "leathery" during cooking. Poisonous Mushrooms There seems to be no rule by which the ordinary consumer, unless an expert, can distinguish between edible and poisonous mushrooms. Practically the only safe way is to purchase those...

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