The spirit of laws, Volume 1

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G. Bell, 1906 - Jurisprudence
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User Review  - aegossman - LibraryThing

One of the best books I have ever read and ever shall hope to read at least three more times in my lifetime... if only all books were only a slight fraction of the merit of this (and all of M's works I have read) book then I daresay I would never stop reading. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wildbill - LibraryThing

The first time I started this book I was in my teens. This time I was able to get past the first fifty pages and found an enjoyable and at times disturbing book. The book contains elements of satire ... Read full review

Contents

Of the Principle of Monarchy
27
Of the Principle of Despotic Government
28
Difference of Obedience in Moderate and Despotic Govern ments
29
Reflections on the preceding Chapters
31
Of Education in Monarchies
32
Of Education in a Despotic Government
35
Difference between the Effects of Ancient and Modern Edu cation
36
Of some Institutions among the Greeks
37
In what Cases these singular Institutions may be of Service
40
That the Laws given by the Legislator ought to be in relation to the Principle of Government 1 Idea of this Rook
43
t is meant by a Love of the Republic in a Democracy
44
In what Manner the Love of Equality and Frugality is inspired
45
In what Manner the Laws establish Equality in a Democracy
46
In what Manner the Laws ought to maintain Frugality in a Democracy
49
Other Methods of favouring the Principle of Democracy
51
In what Manner the Laws should relate to the Principle of Government in an Aristocracy
54
In what Manner the Laws are in relation to their Principle in Monarchies
58
Of the Expedition peculiar to the Executive Power in Monarchies
59
Of the Excelh nee of a Monarchical Government GO 12 The same Subject continued
62
The same Subject continued
68
Of the Coinmunicution of Power
70
Of Presents
71
Of Rewards conferred by the Sovereign
72
New Consequences of the Principles of the three Govern ments
73
Consequences of the Principles of different Govern ments with respect to the Simplicity of Civil and Criminal Laws the Form of Judgments and the in...
77
Of the Simplicity of Criminal Laws in different Governments
80
In what Governments and in what Cases the Judges ougnt to determine according to the express Letter of the Law
81
Of the Manner of passing Judgment
82
In what Governments the Sovereign may be Judge
83
That in Monarchies Ministers ought not to sit as Judges
86
Of Accusation in different Governments
87
? Of the Severity of Punishments in different Governments
88
Of the ancient French Laws
89
Of the Power of Punishments
90
Insufficiency of the I aws of Japan
92
Of the Spirit of the Roman Senate
94
Of the Roman Laws in respect to Punishments
95
Of the just Proportion between Punishments and Crimes
97
Of the Rack
99
Of the Law of Retaliation
100
Of the Clemency of the Prince
101
Consequences of the different Principles of the three Governments with respect to Sumptuary Laws Luxury and the Condition of Women 1 Of Luxury
102
Of Sumptuary Laws in a Democracy
104
Of Sumptuary Laws in an Aristocracy
105
Of Sumptuary Laws in a Monarchy
106
In what Cases Sumptuary Lawa are useful in a Monarchy
107
Of the Luxury of China
108
Fatal Consequences of Luxury in China
109
Of Public Continency
110
Of the Condition or State of Women in different Governments
111
Of the Domestio Tribunal among the Romans
112
In what Manner the Institutions changed at Eorne together with the Government
113
Of the Guardianship of Women among the Romans
114
Sumptuary Laws among the Romans
116
An excellent Custom of the Samnites
117
Of Female Administration IIS BOOK VIII Of the Corruption of the Principle of the three Government 1 General Idea of this Book
118
Of the Corruption of the Principles of Democracy
119
Of the Spirit of extreme Equality
121
Of the Corruption of the Principle of Aristocracy
122
f the Corruption of the Principle of Monarchy
123
The same Subject continued
124
Danger of the Corruption of the Principle of Monarchical Government
125
Of the Corruption of the Principle of Despotic Government
126
The same Subject continued
128
The tffect of an Oath among virtuous People
129
How the smallest Change of the Constitution is attended with the Ruin of its Principles
130
Distinctive Properties of a Monarchy
131
Particular Case of the Spanish Monarchy
132
Hstinctive Properties of a Despotic Government
133
In what Manner Republics provide for their Safety
136
That a Confederate Government ought to be composed of States of the same Nature especially of the Republican Kind
138
In what Manner Despotic Governments provide for their Se curity
139
In what Manner a Monarchical Government provides for its Security
140
A Reflection
141
A particular Case in which the Defensive Force of a State is inferior to the Offensive
142
Of the Weakness of neighbouring States
143
Of War ibid 3 Of the Right of Conquest
144
Some Advantages of a oonquered People
147
ielon King of Syracuse
148
The same Subject continued
150
Of one Monarchy that subdues another
151
Of the Manners of a oonquered People
152
Of a Law of Cyrus ibid 13 Charles XII
153
Alexander
154
New Methods of preserving a Conquest
158
Of Conquests made by a Despotio Prince
159
Of the Laws which establish Political Liberty with regard to the Constitution 1 A General Idea
160
In what Liberty consists
161
The same Subject continued ibid 5 Of the Enl or View of different Governments
162
Of the Monarchies we are acquainted with
174
Aristotles Manner of Thinking
176
Of the Government of the Kings of Home and in what Manner the three Powers were there distributed
178
General Reflections on the State of Home after the Expulsion of its Kings
180
In what Manner the Distribution of the three Powers began to change after the Expulsion of the Kings
181
In what Manner Rome in the flourishing State of that Republic suddenly lost its Liberty
183
Of the Legislative Power in the Roman Republic
184
Of the Executive Power in the same Republic
185
Of the Judiciary Power in the Roman Government
187
Of the Government of the Roman Provinces
194
The End of this Book
196
Of the Liberty of the Subject
197
The same Subject continued
198
Of certain Accusations that require particular Moderation and Prudence
201
Of the Crime against Nature
202
Of the Crime of High Treason
204
The same Subject continued
206
The same Subject continued
207
Of the Manner of Governing in Monarchies
219
Of the Regard which Monarchs owe to their Subjects 2S0 29 Of the Civil Laws proper for mixing some Portion of Liberty in a Despotic Government
221
The same Subject continued
222
Of the Relation which the Levying of Taxes and the Greatness of the Public Revenues bear to Liberty 1 Of the Public Revenues
223
Of Taxes in Countries where Part of the People are Villains or Bondmen
224
Of a Republic in the like Case
225
Of Taxes in Countries where Villainage is not established
226
In what Manner the Deception is preserved
228
That the Greatness of Taxes depends on the Nature of the Government
229
Relation between the Weight of Taxes and Liberty
230
In what Government Taxes are capable of Increase
231
That the Nature of the Taxes is in relation to the Govern ment
232
Abuse of Liberty
233
Of the Conquests of the Mahomedans
234
Of an Exemption from Taxes
235
Which is more suitable to the Prince and to the People the Farming the Revenues or managing them by Commission?
236
OfLamm in relation to the Nature of the Climate 1 General Idea
238
Contradiction in tho Tempers of some Southern Nations
242
That those are bad Legislators who favour the Vices of the Climate and good Legislators who oppose those Vices
243
Of Agriculture in Warm Climates
244
An excellent Custom of China
245
Of the Laws in relation to the Distempers of the Climate
247
Of the Laws against Suicides
249
Effects arising from the Climate of England
250
Other Effects of the Climate
251
Of the different Confidence which the Laws have in the People according to the difference of Climates
252
In what Manner the Laws of Civil Slavery relate to the Nature of the Climate 1 Of Civil Slavery
253
Origin of the Right of Slavery among the Roman Civilians
254
Another Origin of the Right of Slavery
256
Of the Slavery of the Negroes
257
The true Origin of the Right of Slavery ibid 7 Another Origin of the Right of Slavery
258
Inutility of Slavery among us
259
Several Kinds of Slavery
260
Danger from the Multitude of Slaves
261
Of armed Slaves
262
The same Subject continued
263
Regulations between Masters and Slaves
265
Of Enfranchisements
266
Of Freeduien and Eunuchs
268
Of Domestic Servitude
270
That a Plurality of Wives greatly depends on the Means of supporting them
271
That the Law of Polygamy is an Affair that depends on Calculation
272
The Beason of a Law of Malabar
273
Of an Equality of Treatment in case of many Wives
274
Of the Separation of Women from Men
275
The Principle on which the Morals of the East are founded
276
Of Domestic Slavery independently of Polygamy
278
Of Jealousy
279
Of the Eastern Manner of Domestio Government ibid 15 Of Divorce and Repudiation
280
Of Repudiation and Divorce among the Romans
281
BOOK XVILHow the Laws of Political Servitude bear a Relation to the Nature of the Climate 1 Of Political Servitude
284
The Difference between Nations iu point of Courage ibid 3 Of the Climate of Asia
285
The Consequences resulting from this
287
That when the People in the North of Asia and those of the North of Europe made Conquests the Effects of the Con quests were not the same
288
A new Physical Cause of the Slavery of Asia and of the Liberty of Europe
289
Of Africa and America
290
Of Law in the relation they bear to the Naturs of the Soil 1 How the Nature of the Soil has an Influence on the Laws
291
The same Subject continued
292
What Countries are bet cultivated ibid 4 New Effects of the Fertility and Barrenness of Countries
293
Of the Inhabitants of Islands
294
Of Human Industry
295
Of Population in the Relation it bears to the Manner of pro curing Subsistence
296
Of the Law of Nations among People who do not cultivate the Earth
297
Of the Political State of the People who do not oultivate the Land
298
Of People who know the use of Money ibid 16 Of Civil Laws amoug People who know not the use of Money
299
Of the Power of Superstition
300
Of the Law of Nations as practised by the Tartars
301
The Civil Law of the Tartars
302
Of the Regal Ornaments among the Franks
308
Childeric
309
The same Subject continued
310
Of Adoption among the Germans
311
Of the Sanguinary Temper of the Kings of the Franks
312
Of the Authority of the Clergy under the First Race
313
Of Laws in relation to the Principles which form the general Spirit the Morals and Customs of a Nation PAGB 1 Of the Subject of this Book
314
Of Tyranny
315
Of the general Spirit of Mankind 31i
316
That Everything ought not to be corrected
317
Of the Vanity and Pride of Nations
318
Of the Charaoter of the Spaniards and Chinese
319
A Reflection
320
Of the Behaviour of the Chinese
321
The Influence of Domestic Government on the Political
322
How some Legislators have confounded the Principles which govern Mankind
323
Of the peculiar Quality of the Chinese Government
324
A Consequence drawn from the preceding Chapter
325
How this Union of Keligion Laws Manners and Customs among the Chinese was effected
326
Explanation of a Paradox relating to the Chinese 37
327
How the Laws ought to have a Relation to Manners and Customs
328
The same Subject continued
329
The same Subject continued ibid 27 How the Laws contribute to form the Manners Cnstoms and Character of a Nation
331
Of Laws in relation to Commerce considered in its Nature and Distinctions 1 Of Commerce 310
340
Of the Spirit of Commerce
341
Of the Poverty of the People 342
342
Of Nations that have entered into an economical Commerce 314
344
The Spirit of England with respect to Commerce
345
In what Manner economical Commerce has been some times restrained
346
An Institution adapted to economical Commerce
347
The same Subject continued
348
The Laws of Commerce concerning the Confiscation of Mer chandise
349
Of seizing the Persons of Merchants
350
A Law of Rhodes
351
That a Prince ought not to engage himself in Commerce
352
VOL I
353
To what Nations Commerce is prejudicial
354
Different Significations of the word Liberty ibid
2

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