The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture: A Discussion for the Amateur, and the Professional and Commercial Grower, of the Kinds, Characteristics and Methods of Cultivation of the Species of Plants Grown in the Regions of the United States and Canada for Ornament, for Fancy, for Fruit and for Vegetables; with Keys to the Natural Families and Genera, Descriptions of the Horticultural Capabilities of the States and Provinces and Dependent Islands, and Sketches of Eminent Horticulturists, Volume 2

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Liberty Hyde Bailey
Macmillan, 1914 - Gardening - 3639 pages
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Very cool book, written in 1900, I love it. They knew alot then, even without modern technology. The portion on cacutus is extemely amazing.

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Page 876 - An acre of cranberries in full bearing will produce over 200 bushels ; and the fruit generally sells, in the markets of Boston, for $1.50 per bushel, and much higher than in former years. Although a moist soil is best suited to the plant, yet, with a suitable mixture of bog earth, it will flourish, producing abundant crops, even in any dry soil. There is said to be a variety of cranberry in Russia of a superior size.
Page 921 - ... and of good size and good quality, and ripens evenly, but has not been quite as productive as some others. DISEASES OF THE CURRANT. The currant is affected by very few diseases. The only ones which do much injury are the following : — LEAF SPOT — RUST (Septoria ribis, Desm.). — The Leaf Spot fungus affects black, red and white currants, causing the leaves to fall prematurely, and thus weakening the bushes. This disease is first noticed about midsummer, when small brownish spots appear on...
Page 666 - The Greeks cultivate roses, gillyflowers, violets, narcissi, and iris," gillyflower being the old English name for the Carnation. It was not, however, until the beginning of the sixteenth century that the development of the Carnation into numerous varieties made an impression upon its history. The original flesh-color of its flowers was already broken up into its component colors, red and white.
Page 922 - ... of small brown spots. Soon the affected leaves turn yellow and fall prematurely to the ground. The fruit may also wither before ripening properly, owing to lack of food or moisture. Spraying with bordeaux mixture, 5-5-50, is recommended as an aid in controlling this disease. It would be wise, where currant anthracnose is troublesome, to spray the bushes thoroughly before the leaves appear, using lime-sulfur at scale strength. A second spraying should be made with bordeaux when the leaves are...
Page 694 - A fertilizer analyzing 3 to 4 per cent of nitrogen, 6 to 8 per cent of phosphoric acid, and 9 to 10 per cent of potash may be considered an average for most soils.
Page 922 - ... Currant anthracnose This disease, which may be mistaken for leaf spot, affects the leaves, leafstalks, young branches, fruit, and fruitstalks. On the leaves it appears during the month of June in the form of small brown spots. Soon the affected leaves turn yellow and fall prematurely to the ground. The fruit may also wither before ripening properly, owing to lack of food or moisture. Spraying with bordeaux mixture, 5-5-50, is recommended as an aid in controlling this disease. It would be wise,...
Page 873 - ... upright-growing varieties. The need is for good varieties producing small, hard seeds that will not crack and that retain their vitality for more than one year. Many new varieties have been secured from foreign countries and a large number of others developed by hybridization, some of which show great promise. The cowpea is to the South what clover is to the North, and the lessening of the cost of the seed and the improvement of varieties are the two important problems that need to be thoroughly...
Page 921 - ... bordeaux and arsenate of lead together when spraying for the currant worm. In case it becomes necessary to apply a spray at a time when bordeaux would color the fruit, ammoniacal copper carbonate may be used to advantage. Currant anthracnose This disease, which may be mistaken for leaf spot, affects the leaves, leafstalks, young branches, fruit, and fruitstalks. On the leaves it appears during the month of June in the form of small brown spots. Soon the affected leaves turn yellow and fall prematurely...
Page 922 - ... appear, using lime-sulfur at scale strength. A second spraying should be made with bordeaux when the leaves are unfolding, and successive sprayings at intervals of ten to fourteen days until the fruit is nearly full-grown; there is danger of its being discolored by the spray when ripe. Arsenate of lead should be added to the mixture when the first brood of the currant worm appears. A thorough spraying after the fruit is harvested is desirable. INSECT PESTS Currant •worm The currant worm is...
Page 919 - ... a liberal supply of wood two years and older, but as the fruit on the very old wood is not so good as that on the younger, it is best to depend largely on two and three year old wood to bear the fruit. A little pruning may be necessary at the end of the first season after planting in order to begin to get the bush into shape. From six to eight main stems, or even less, with their side branches will, when properly distributed, bear a good crop of fruit. Future pruning should be done with the aim...