The Story of Helena Modjeska, (Madame Chlapowska)

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W. H. Allen, 1885 - 296 pages
 

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Page 252 - Warsaw and pay off her debt to the Imperial Theatre than to remain idle. She had not seriously entertained the idea of playing there without hearing again from Mr. Sergent; as, if he had arranged for her appearance in London, she would have been very willing to return there immediately, and pay her debt to the Imperial Theatre in money. But Mr. Sergent did not write or communicate with her in any way; and being left like this, without any agent, it seemed to her that she had better pay her debt than...
Page 290 - Rosalind. From a photograph The dress which she wears shows her slender form to admiration. It is made from Mr. Forbes-Robertson's beautiful design, but the colors Madame Modjeska chose for herself. Instead of the brown tints which Miss Litton wore, Madame Modjeska's cloak and hat are blue. Perhaps no dress she has ever worn has suited her so well as this picturesque costume, with its feathered hat, its doublet, and long, tight-fitting boots of buff leather. The wide blue velvet cloak, which would...
Page 251 - ... power ; or rather that she was changed, new, surprising. The house became positively frantic, and when the act was over half the audience crowded on to the stage to offer their congratulations. A much greater triumph for the actress than the enthusiasm of the public was that her comrades were excited ; and possibly it was one of the most wonderful moments in Madame Modjeska's life, when her old rival Madame Thespis came to her room and, flinging herself into her arms, absolutely wept with enthusiasm...
Page 6 - Modjeska's earliest rememtrance of her childhood is that of seeing a man shot in the street. There was a great scream outside the house ; the children all ran to see what it could be, and as they rushed out saw the blood flow from the wound. They were familiarised with the sights and sounds of fighting ; and Madame Modjeska can well remember hiding behind the wall to pick up shot and gather it in her pinafore. When she was five years old she made one of a number of children who were dressed in white,...
Page 272 - Heartsease " in the evening. On her first appearance at night the house was full of celebrities ; Gustave Dore, Bastien Lepage, Alma Tadema, Joachim, Madame Trebelli — all sorts of artists and people of consequence, including Mdlle. Sara Bernhardt, who brought an immense bouquet to throw to the new Constance. Then followed three months of the greatest possible success and of great excitement. Everybody petted and spoiled the new actress ; those of her own profession were generously kind to her...
Page 244 - ... returned to Cracow for the great jubilee given in honour of Kraszewski. It was in the beginning of October 1879 that this national fete was held. Josef Kraszewski is a great Polish poet and novelist, and a most ardent patriot. He is one of the most popular of Polish authors, and he is the most productive author of modern times, excepting, perhaps, Dumas pere. His works are counted by hundreds. His writings are marked by a strong moral and patriotic tendency, and it is well known that his aim...
Page 281 - ... part. She trembled at the idea of playing Shakespearian tragedy in London. At first the houses for " Romeo and Juliet " were not good ; but by degrees they improved ; and when Madame Modjeska at last saw full houses again, her pronunciation became very much better. Encouragement gave her confidence. " Romeo and Juliet " ran two months, and then Madame Modjeska desired again to make a change ; she was very anxious to produce Mr. Wills's " Juana." The history of this play is very curious. It seems...
Page 262 - ... also conquering a slight Yankee accent which she had acquired in America. And she determined to make an appearance as soon as possible. She might have engaged the Imperial or the Olympic for evening performances, but she did not think those theatres were suitable ones for her to make an appearance at. The Adelphi Theatre she was able to have in the afternoon ; but all the other theatres were engaged entirely. She seriously thought of taking the Adelphi to give some matinees, when she met Mr....
Page 276 - No, not much," is the answer. "Yes, it 's beautiful !" from someone else of authority in the stalls. "It's perfectly charming!

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