The Story of Bread

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I H C service bureau of the International harvester Company of America, 1911 - Agricultural machinery - 27 pages
 

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Page 17 - Land without population is a wilderness and population without land is a mob. The United States has many social, political, and economic questions — some old, some new— to settle in the near future; but none so fundamental as the true relation of the land to the national life.
Page 8 - Tell me what you eat and I'll tell you what you are," that because a man eats pork he must certainly be a pig.
Page 28 - ... more to the wealth of his country than both France and Prussia together wasted in the bloody war which they fought in 1870-71. JUSTIN S. MORRILL (1810-1898). The Land-Grant Act, signed by President Lincoln in 1862, was the work of Mr. Morrill, who at the time was a Congressman from Vermont. This act gave to each State a certain amount of land, the proceeds from the sale of which were to be used for colleges of agriculture and the mechanic arts, "without excluding other scientific and classical...
Page 7 - ... have given us the fine large grains which now go to make our daily bread. Enough of these grains were gathered from the wheat fields of the United States in 1910 to make nearly 700,000,000 bushels. Were all these bushels placed in freight cars, and the cars coupled together, there would be two mammoth trains — one reaching from New York to San Francisco, and the other from Regina, which is the capital of Saskatchewan up in Canada, down to New Orleans, in Louisiana, with several hundred cars...
Page 26 - But pieces of wire found their way into the throats of cattle, and farmers tabooed the binder.
Page 29 - The next year two reapers were sold, then fifty, then a thousand, and on and on, up and up climbed the sales. Constant plugging away — "Keeping everlastingly at it

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