The Teacher's Manual: Being an Exposition of an Efficient and Economical System of Education, Suited to the Wants of a Free People

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Marsh, Capen, Lyon, and Webb, 1840 - Education - 263 pages
 

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It is amazing how much one can learn while browsing and searching. I will continue to read this manual in my free time. For now, I am thankful I found this [free] copy because it has helped me find a quote that I was in search for. I will share the quote when I am done with the book, and furthermore, I will be using the quote for my personal statement and would like to keep it a secret. =) I will be getting ready to apply and transfer to a 4-year school from my community college. I am very thankful that I found this manual, it has inspired me immensely.  

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Page 97 - Therefore speak I to them in parables, because seeing they see not, and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand...
Page 127 - He sucks intelligence in every clime, And spreads the honey of his deep research At his return — a rich repast for me. He travels, and I too. I tread his deck, Ascend his topmast, through his peering eyes Discover countries, with a kindred heart Suffer his woes, and share in his escapes ; While fancy, like the finger of a clock, Runs the great circuit, and is still at home.
Page 257 - Lacedemonians, that honest people, more virtuous than polite, rose up all to a man, and with the greatest respect received him among them. The Athenians being suddenly touched with a sense of the Spartan virtue, and their own degeneracy, gave a thunder of applause ; and. the old man cried out, " The Athenians understand what is good, but the Lacedemonians practise it
Page 257 - Athens, during a public representation of some play exhibited in honour of the commonwealth, that an old gentleman came too late for a place suitable to his age and quality. Many of the young gentlemen, who observed the difficulty and confusion he was in, made signs to him that they would accommodate him, if he came where they sat.
Page 109 - You make him a denizen of all nations, a contemporary of all ages. The world has been created for him. It is hardly possible but the character should take a higher and better tone from the constant habit of associating in thought with a class of thinkers, to say the least of it, above the average of humanity.
Page 227 - I care not, fortune, what you me deny ; You cannot rob me of free nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face, You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve : Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave : Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
Page 126 - Tis pleasant through the loopholes of retreat To peep at such a world ; to see the stir Of the great Babel, and not feel the crowd...
Page 232 - What reward ! A large comprehensive soul, well purged from vulgar fears, and perturbations, and prejudices; able to comprehend and interpret the works of man — of God. A rich flourishing cultivated mind, pregnant with inexhaustible stores of entertainment and reflection. A perpetual spring of fresh ideas — and the conscious dignity of superior intelligence. Good Heaven...
Page 112 - The poet's or historian's page, by one Made vocal for the amusement of the rest...

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