The Textbook: How to Use and Judge it

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Macmillan, 1920 - Text books and utility - 265 pages
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Page 189 - Those who have read of everything are thought to understand everything too ; but it is not always so. Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge ; it is thinking that makes what we read ours. We are of the ruminating kind, and it is not enough to cram ourselves with a great load of collections ; unless we chew them over again, they will not give us strength and nourishment.
Page 189 - Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge ; it is thinking makes what we read ours. We are of the ruminating kind, and it is not enough to cram ourselves with a great load of collections ; unless we chew them over again, they ,will not give us strength and nourishment. There are indeed in some writers visible instances of deep thoughts, close and acute reasoning, and ideas well pursued.
Page 34 - A man and his wife usually drank out a cask of beer in 12 days ; but when the man was from home, it lasted the woman 30 days ; how many days would the man alone be in drinking it ? Ans.
Page 38 - The first error that I would mention is a too general attention to the dead languages, with a neglect of our own. * * This neglect is so general that there is scarcely an institution to be found in the country where the English tongue is taught regularly from its elements to its pure and regular construction in prose and verse. Perhaps in most schools boys are taught the definition of...
Page 37 - When I was young, the books used were chiefly or wholly Dilworth's SpellIng Books, the Psalter. Testament, and Bible. No geography was studied before the publication of Dr. Morse's small books on that subject, about the year 1186 or П87.
Page 38 - No English grammar was generally taught in common schools when I was young, except that in Dilworth, and that to no good purpose. In short, the instruction in schools was very imperfect, in every branch; and if I am not misinformed, it is so to this day, in many branches. Indeed there is danger of running from one extreme to another, and instead of having too few books in our schools, we shall have too many.
Page 39 - ... objects. Examples should be presented to the senses which are the inlets of all our knowledge. Another error which is frequent in America, is that a master undertakes to teach many different branches in the same school. In new settlements, where the people are poor, and live in scattered situations, the practice is often unavoidable. But in populous towns it must be considered as a defective plan of education. For suppose the teacher to be equally master of all the branches which he attempts...
Page 35 - Whoever shall be able to read Tully or any other such like classical author at sight, and correctly and without assistance to speak and write Latin both in prose and verse, and to inflect exactly the paradigms of Greek nouns and verbs, has a right to expect to be admitted into the college, and no one may claim admission without these qualifications.
Page 38 - I introduced short notices of the geography and history of the United States, and these led to more enlarged descriptions of the country. In 1788, at the request of Dr. Morse, I wrote an account of the transactions in the United States, after the Revolution; which account fills nearly twenty pages in the first volume of his octavo editions. Before the Revolution, and for some years after, no slates were used in common schools: all writing and operations in arithmetic were on paper.
Page 31 - Deduct the tare and trett as before, and divide the suttle by 168 (because 2 Ib. is the T^ of 3 cwt.) the quotient will be the cloff, which subtract from the suttle, and the remainder will be the neat weight.

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