The Theory and Practice of Ore Dressing

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McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1915 - Ore-dressing - 426 pages
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Page 45 - ... of material discomfort, mischief, and disaster. Undoubtedly the defendants were engaged in a perfectly lawful business, in which large expenditures had been made, and with which wide-spread interests were connected. But however laudable an industry may be, its managers are still subject to the rule, that their property cannot be so used as to inflict injury on the property of their neighbors. " Every man," Lord Turso observed in Egerton v.
Page 44 - The right to water in this country, by priority of appropriation thereof, we think it is, and has always been, the duty of the national and state governments to protect. The right itself, and the obligation to protect it, existed prior to legislation on the subject of irrigation. It is entitled to protection as well after patent to a third party of the land over which the natural stream flows, as when such land is a part of the public domain; and it is immaterial whether or not it be mentioned in...
Page 401 - ... field of much higher intensity. This intensity of the magnetic field depends: 1. On the size of the magnet. 2. On the shape of the magnet. 3. On the distance between the magnet and the body to be attracted. 4. On the number of...
Page 402 - The magnetomotive force in a magnetic circuit is directly proportional to the number of ampere-turns; the reluctance is directly proportional to the length of the circuit and inversely proportional to the sectional area, and likewise, to the permeability of the substances in the circuit.
Page 321 - ... hence larger grains can more readily pass into the hutch. An examination of the tailings indicated that the loss in the fine material was very small, but by far the largest loss was in the four coarsest sizes, which were mixed grains or middlings, and to reduce this loss further crushing must be done. The results indicate that in order to separate sphalerite and quartz, a jig of at least three compartments should be used ; since smaller differences in the specific gravity of these minerals require...
Page 405 - ... magnet. The armature is made up of thin laminated discs, of a special annealed wrought iron painted with shellac, which are pressed tightly together and securely held by heavy cheek plates screwed on at either end. The type C separator, designed to treat minerals of high permeability, has these discs so cut and placed on the shaft as to give a slotted appearance horizontally on the armature...
Page 403 - The principle of its operation is shown 4S in Fig. 787. The material flows from the holes of the hopper to the feed roller, which discharges it in a uniform layer over the whole width of the conveyor belt, passing between the poles of the magnetic system. The latter consists of two or more horseshoe electromagnets, the poles of which are arranged one above the other. The poles of the upper magnets have the shape of a sharp wedge while the lower ones are flattened. With this arrangement of the magnets,...
Page 402 - By the term permeability is meant a numerical coefficient which expresses how much greater the number of lines generated in a substance by a given magnetomotive force is than those which would be generated in air by the same force.
Page 126 - Va is the cubic feet of free air passing per second, r is the compression ratio (obtained by adding the gauge pressure of the air to 14.7 and dividing by 14.7), c is a constant depending upon the diameter of the pipe as follows: " Harris, EG, "Compressed Air...
Page 53 - thick layers, in native bed Rock equal to best ashlar masonry Rock equal to best brick masonry Rock equal to poor brick masonry Clay...

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