The Thirteen Books of Euclid's Elements, Volume 3

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1956 - Mathematics - 560 pages
2 Reviews
Volume 3 of three-volume set containing complete English text of all 13 books of the Elements plus critical apparatus analyzing each definition, postulate, and proposition in great detail. Covers textual and linguistic matters; mathematical analyses of Euclid's ideas; classical, medieval, Renaissance and modern commentators; refutations, supports, extrapolations, reinterpretations and historical notes. Vol. 3 includes Books 10-13: Commensurable magnitudes, solids, cones, cylinders.
 

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The very personal computer

Contents

I
1
II
10
III
14
IV
17
V
20
VI
22
VII
24
VIII
26
LXVI
142
LXVII
143
LXVIII
145
LXIX
147
LXX
149
LXXI
150
LXXII
151
LXXIII
155

IX
28
XII
31
XIII
33
XIV
34
XV
36
XVI
37
XVII
39
XVIII
40
XIX
41
XX
45
XXI
47
XXII
49
XXIII
51
XXIV
53
XXV
55
XXVI
56
XXVII
58
XXVIII
60
XXIX
61
XXX
66
XXXI
68
XXXII
69
XXXIII
71
XXXIV
75
XXXV
78
XXXVI
80
XXXVII
83
XXXVIII
84
XXXIX
85
XL
87
XLI
88
XLII
89
XLIII
92
XLIV
94
XLV
95
XLVI
98
XLVII
99
XLIX
101
L
102
LI
104
LII
106
LIII
109
LIV
110
LV
112
LVI
116
LVII
120
LVIII
124
LIX
125
LX
128
LXI
130
LXII
132
LXIII
135
LXIV
137
LXV
139
LXXIV
158
LXXV
159
LXXVI
161
LXXVII
163
LXXVIII
164
LXXIX
165
LXXX
167
LXXXI
168
LXXXII
170
LXXXIII
172
LXXXIV
173
LXXXV
174
LXXXVI
177
LXXXVII
178
LXXXVIII
180
LXXXIX
181
XC
184
XCI
186
XCII
188
XCIII
190
XCIV
194
XCV
199
XCVI
203
XCVII
206
XCVIII
209
XCIX
212
C
215
CI
218
CII
221
CIII
224
CIV
227
CV
229
CVI
231
CVII
232
CVIII
233
CIX
234
CX
235
CXI
236
CXII
238
CXIII
240
CXIV
243
CXV
248
CXVI
252
CXVII
254
CXVIII
255
CXIX
260
CXX
272
CXXI
365
CXXII
436
CXXIII
438
CXXIV
508
CXXVI
515
CXXVII
523
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About the author (1956)

Little is known about the life of Euclid, an important Greek mathematician. He lived at Alexandria, in the time of the first Ptolemy, 323-283 B.C. He was the founder of a school of mathematics there. Euclid's compilation of the major results of ancient geometry in a comprehensive axiomatic framework remains a classic and easily the most influential scientific work of all time. Beginning with definitions, axioms, and postulates, the Elements deduces hundreds of general theorems about plane and solid geometry, including the famous Pythagorean theorem. It is claimed that, when asked by King Ptolemy if he could make his solutions easier to follow, Euclid said, "There is no royal road to geometry," In 1570, Sir Henry Billingsley first translated the Elements into English.