The Trauma of Birth

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Psychology Press, 1999 - Psychology - 224 pages
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Conflicting Identities and Multiple Masculinities takes as its focus the construction of masculinity in Western Europe from the early Middle Ages until the fifteenth century, crossing from pre-Christian Scandinavia across western Christendom. The essays consult a broad and representative cross section of sources including the work of theological, scholastic, and monastic writers, sagas, hagiography and memoirs, material culture, chronicles, exampla and vernacular literature, sumptuary legislation, and the records of ecclesiastical courts. The studies address questions of what constituted male identity, and male sexuality. How was masculinity constructed in different social groups? How did the secular and ecclesiastical ideals of masculinity reinforce each other or diverge? These essays address the topic of medieval men and, through a variety of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary approaches, significantly extend our understanding of how, in the Middle Ages, masculinity and identity were conflicted and multifarious.
 

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Contents

THE ANALYTIC SITUATION i
3
INFANTILE ANXIETY
11
SEXUAL GRATIFICATION
30
NEUROTIC REPRODUCTION
46
SYMBOLIC ADAPTATION
74
HEROIC COMPENSATION
106
RELIGIOUS SUBLIMATION
117
ARTISTIC IDEALIZATION
141
PHILOSOPHIC SPECULATION
167
PSYCHOANALYTICAL KNOWLEDGE
183
THE THERAPEUTIC ASPECT
200
INDEX
218
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Human Emotions
Carroll E. Izard
No preview available - 1977
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About the author (1999)

Considered to be one of the most gifted psychotherapists of his time, Otto Rank investigated matters "beyond psychology" and became known for his energy, intellectual curiosity, and self-awareness. Born in Vienna, Rank had a very deprived childhood. Despite troubled feelings and suicidal thoughts during his adolescence, he read a great deal and became interested in the psychology of creativity. He first formulated his theories about art and neuroses in the series of remarkable daybooks (1903--1904). In 1912 he helped to found Imago, the first European journal of psychoanalysis. In the years of his association with Sigmund Freud from 1905 to 1925, he served as secretary to the psychoanalytic movement, and it was generally assumed that Freud regarded him as his successor. Rank, however, eventually came to see the roots of all psychoneuroses in the experience of birth. This theory he described in The Trauma of Birth (1924). Such differences caused his break with Freud in the middle 1920s, after which he lived in Paris and then New York.

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