The Truth about Lorin Jones: A Novel

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Little, Brown, 1988 - Fiction - 328 pages
2 Reviews
Polly Aller, a single parent and compassionate feminist, researches the untimely death of painter Lorin Jones, only to be exposed to fast-paced worlds beyond her experiece and her own difficult questions

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User Review  - nocto - LibraryThing

I used to covet these Abacus editions of Alison Lurie's books while hanging out in the Old Brompton Road branch of Waterstone's in the early 1990s. The surprising thing is that I never read any of ... Read full review

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User Review  - keywestnan - LibraryThing

When people ask me to recommend a novel set in Key West, this is usually my first answer. Alison Lurie, who has been a winter resident of the island for many years, is her usual sharp, funny self. Read full review

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About the author (1988)

Novelist Alison Lurie was born September 3, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois to Harry and Bernice Stewart Lurie. She is an American novelist and academic. Lurie won the Pulitzer Prize for her 1984 novel Foreign Affairs. She received an A.B. from Radcliffe College in 1947. After finishing college, Lurie worked as an editorial assistant for Oxford University Press in New York, but she wanted to make a living as a writer. After years of receiving rejection slips, she devoted herself to raising her children. Lurie had taught at Cornell University since 1968, becoming a full professor in 1976 specializing in folklore and children's literature. Lurie's first novel was "Love and Friendship" (1962) and its characters were modeled on friends and colleagues. Afterwards, she published "The Nowhere City" (1965), "Imaginary Friends" (1967), "The War Between the Tates" (1974), which tells of the collapse of a perfect marriage between a professor and his wife, "Only Children" (1979), and "The Truth About Lorin Jones" (1988). "Foreign Affairs" (1984) won the Pulitzer Prize; it tells the story of two academics in England who learn more about love than academia.

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