The Voyage of the Beagle, Volume 29

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P.F. Collier, 1909 - Beagle Expedition - 547 pages
3 Reviews
This is Charles Darwin's chronicle of his five-year journey, beginning in 1831, around the world as a naturalist on the H.M.S. Beagle.
 

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the book was great

Review: Voyage of the Beagle : Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches

User Review  - Frightful_elk - Goodreads

Definitely no page turner, but the persistent reader will find rewards. Besides the knowing smile at watching a great find chew over a problem you know the answer to, I found this book primarily of ... Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
28
III
47
IV
70
V
88
VI
112
VII
128
VIII
147
XII
257
XIII
277
XIV
295
XV
317
XVI
341
XVII
376
XVIII
406
XIX
435

IX
182
X
209
XI
236
XX
456
XXI
486

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Page 327 - And they had breastplates, as it were breastplates of iron: and the sound of their wings was as the sound of chariots of many horses running to battle.
Page 1 - The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career...
Page 27 - Chile, when my servant, noticing that one of the horses was very restive, went to see what was the matter, and fancying he could distinguish something, suddenly put his hand on the beast's withers, and secured the vampire.
Page 500 - Pampas, which are serviceable to mankind, produced an equal impression? I can scarcely analyze these feelings : but it must be partly owing to the free scope given to the imagination. The plains of Patagonia are boundless, for they are scarcely passable, and hence unknown : they bear the stamp of having lasted, as they are now, for ages, and there appears no limit to their duration through future time.
Page 434 - It is certainly a fact, which cannot be controverted, that most of the diseases which have raged in the islands during my residence there, have been introduced by ships; and what renders this fact remarkable is, that there might be no appearance of disease among the crew of the ship which conveyed this destructive importation.
Page 377 - Seeing this gradation and diversity of structure in one small, intimately related group of birds, one might really 1. Geospiza magnirostris. 3. Geospiza parvula. 2. Geospiza fortis. 4. Certhidea olivacea. fancy that from an original paucity of birds in this archipelago, one species had been taken and modified for different ends.
Page 204 - The language of these people, according to our notions, scarcely deserves to be called articulate. Captain Cook has. compared it to a man clearing his throat, but certainly no European ever cleared his throat with so many hoarse, guttural, and clicking sounds.
Page 500 - Tierra del Fuego, where Death and Decay prevail. Both are temples filled with the varied productions of the God of Nature: — no one can stand in these solitudes unmoved, and not feel that there is more in man than the mere breath of his body.
Page 186 - When the condors are wheeling in a flock round and round any spot, their flight is beautiful. Except when rising from the ground, I do not recollect ever having seen one of these birds flap its wings. Near Lima, I watched several for nearly half an hour, without once taking off my eyes : they moved in large curves, sweeping in circles, descending and ascending without giving a single flap.
Page 303 - Shortly after the shock, a great wave was seen from the distance of three or four miles, approaching in the middle of the bay with a smooth outline; but along the shore it tore up cottages and trees, as it swept onwards with irresistible force.

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