The Western World; Or, Travels in the United States in 1846-47: Exhibiting Them in Their Latest Development, Social, Political and Industrial; Including a Chapter on California, Volume 1

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Page 244 - On shore each paper had two other agents, one a boy mounted on horseback, and the other a man on foot, ready to catch the stick to which the manuscript was attached the moment it reached the ground. As soon as he got hold of it he handed it to the boy on horseback, who immediately set off with it at full gallop for the Telegraphoffice. There were frequently five or six thus scrambling for precedence, and as they sometimes all got a good start, the race was a very exciting one. Crowds gathered every...
Page 62 - ... she made demand for anything to be enjoyed by herself alone. In regard to the production of iron she stands now as far above all other States as does your State in regard to cottons, yet does she insist on that perfect protection which must aid in development of the wonderful mineral resources of the country from the Lakes to the Gulf, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. For herself, therefore, she asks nothing. For the Union she asks, and will insist upon, that harmony and peace which must...
Page 326 - ... practicable, he has assumed an Arduous responsibility. He feels himself, therefore, to be directly interested in the success of the political system under which he lives, and all the more so because he is conscious that, in looking to its working, mankind are divided into two great classes—• those who are interested in its failure and those who yearn for its success. Every American is thus, in his own estimation, the Apostle of a particular political creed, in the final triumph and extension...
Page 324 - American exhibits little or none of the local attachments which distinguish the European. His feelings are more centred upon his institutions than his mere country. He looks upon himself more in the light of a republican than in that of a native of a particular territory.
Page 63 - There is no question that the richest soil in the United States is to be found in the ^Mississippi valley. There it is not, as in so many other cases, a thin covering over the clay, the sand, the gravel, the chalk, or the rock; but the deposit of ages, effected by the constant operation of mighty agencies. In some cases the rich black mould is found as much as a hundred feet deep, and when turned up, is as light and free as the driven snow. The pedestrian, as he walks over it, can, in most cases,...
Page 83 - As the fabric of our national greatness towers more and more to heaven, the shadows which it casts over the landscape become deeper and more elongated. We present an imposing front to the world ; but let us turn the picture, and look at the canvass. One out of every seven of us is a pauper. Every six Englishmen have, in addition to their other enormous burdens, to support a seventh between them, whose life is spent in consuming, but in adding nothing to the source of their common subsistence.
Page 241 - ... shapes, characters, prices, and appellations. On board the steamer and on the rail, in the counting-house and the hotel, in the street and in the private dwelling, in the crowded thoroughfare and in the remotest rural district he is ever sure of finding the newspaper. There are daily, tri-weekly, bi-weekly, and weekly papers, as with us; papers purely political, others of a literary cast, and others again simply professional; whilst there are many of no particular character, combining everything...

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