The What, How, and why of Church Building

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1897 - Church architecture - 234 pages
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Page 87 - When we mean to build, We first survey the plot, then draw the model ; And when we see the figure of the house, Then must we rate the cost of the erection ; Which if we find outweighs ability, What do we then but draw anew the model In fewer offices, or at least desist To build at all...
Page 30 - Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in mine house, and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you...
Page 28 - The basal principle of divine justice is that a man "is judged according to that which he hath and not according to that which he hath not.
Page 87 - For which of you, intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first, and counteth the cost, whether he have sufficient to finish it ? Lest haply, after he hath laid the foundation, and is not able to finish...
Page 142 - British thermal unit (BTU) is the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit. The Centigrade unit (CU) is the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water one degree Centigrade.
Page 91 - ... to escape liability on the ground that he exercised ordinary care and skill to understand the same but failed to comprehend them.
Page 266 - PRACTICAL TESTIMONY of the great merits and appreciation of our WINDSOR CEMENT, is, that leading architects throughout the country have called for it on their best and most costly structures, while architects generally have specified it for all kinds and grades of buildings, expensive and inexpensive, as extra cost does not debar its use on even the humblest cottage. Millions of Barrels of it have been used within the last three years.
Page 73 - ... the qualities and strength of materials used in such buildings, the weight of the structures, the relationship of the various operations to be performed by the many trades represented in building, and a knowledge of all other matters directly related to drawing plans and specifications.
Page 99 - The general principle is well settled, that to make one person responsible for the negligent or tortious act of another, the relation of principal and agent, or master and servant, must be shown to have existed at the time, and in respect to the transaction between the wrongdoer and the person sought to be charged.
Page 266 - BOTH FOR PLASTERING WALLS AND CEILINGS. The former to be used with Sand. The latter (being already mixed with Sand) requires but the addition of water.

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