The wonderful pocket, and other stories

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Hislop, 1870 - 192 pages
 

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Page 72 - The ice has broken, the ice has broken ! " and, sure enough, three of the boys had broken through, and were struggling in the water ; and one of them was George.
Page 67 - I do not think so," said his father. "Some of the hardest words I have ever seen are the shortest. I know one little word, with only two letters in it, that very few children, or men either, can always speak.
Page 68 - No, no ; no, no," a great many times. " I am not joking in the least. I really think it is the hardest of all words. It may seem easy enough to you to-night, but perhaps you cannot pronounce it to-morrow." "I can always say it, I know I can," said George with much confidence — " No ! Why, it is as easy to say it as to breathe.
Page 74 - you found it easier to disobey me, and run the risk of losing your own life, than to say that little word you thought so easy last night. You could not say
Page 67 - Only two letters ! What can it be? " cried both the children. " The hardest word," replied their father, " I have ever met with in any language — and I have learned several — is a little word of two letters — No, No.
Page 70 - George hesitated, and said he did not believe it was strong enough ; for it had been frozen over only one night. " Oh, come On ! " said another boy ; " I know it is strong enough. I have known it to freeze over in one night many a time, so itwould bear : haven't you, John 1 " " Yes," answered John Brown ; " it did one night last winter ; and it wasn't as cold as it was last night, either.
Page 73 - George's father and mother were very much frightened when he was brought home, and they learned how narrowly he had escaped drowning. But they were so rejoiced to find that he was safe that they did not ask him how he came to go on the ice, until after tea. When they were all gathered together about the cheerful fire, his father asked him how he came to disobey his positive command. George said he did not want to go, but the boys made him. 10. " How did they make you ? Did they take hold of you,...
Page 73 - How did they make you ? Did they take hold of you, and drag you on ? " asked his father. "No," said George; "but they all wanted me to go." " When they asked you, why did'nt you say 'No'?" " I was going to ; but they called me a coward, and said I was afraid to go; and I couldn't stand that.
Page 71 - George could stand this no longer, for he was rather proud of his courage. " I am not afraid," said he; and he ran to the pond, and was the first one on the ice. The boys enjoyed the sport very much, running and sliding, and trying to catch one...
Page 73 - ... rejoiced to find that he was safe, that they did not ask him how he came to go on the ice, until after tea. When they were all gathered together about the cheerful fire, his father asked him how he came to disobey his positive command. George said he did not want to go, but the boys made him. 10. "How did they make you? Did they take hold of you and drag you on ? " asked his father. — "No," said George; "but they all wanted me to go.

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