The Works of Laurence Sterne ...

Front Cover
W. Strahan, J. Rivington and Sons, J. Dodsley, G. Kearsley, T. Lowndes, G. Robinson, 1780
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 198 - tis no uncommon thing, my good Sancho, for one half of the world to ufe the other half of it like brutes, and then endeavour to make 'em fo.—For my own part, I never look weftward (when I am in a penfive mood at leaft) but I think of the burthens which our brothers and
Page 5 - gave a thoufand penfive, penetrating looks at the chair thou hadft fo often graced, in thofe quiet and fentimental repafts—then laid down my knife and fork, and took out my handkerchief, and clapped it acrofs my face, and wept like a child.—I do fo this very moment, my L.
Page 195 - it is—how bitter a draught—and how many millions are made to drink of it."—Of all my favourite authors, not one has drawn a tear in favour of my mifc'rable black brethren—excepting yourfelf, and the humane author of Sir Geo. Ellifon.— I think you will forgive me; I am fure you will applaud me for
Page 59 - through, before I entered upon my reft. —I ftaid but a moment, and I have been here but: a few, to fatisfy me I have not managed my miferies like a wife man—and if God, for my confolation under them, had not poured forth the fpirit of Shandeifm into me, which will not
Page 34 - knowing where to fend two fets •^ of my Sermons, I could think of no better expedient, than to order them into Mr. Berrenger's hands, who has promifed me that he will wait upon your Lordfhip with them, the firft moment he hears you are in town. The trueft and humbleft thanks I return to your
Page 78 - pofiefs fuch tragic and comic powers, and in fuch an equilibrio, as to divide the world for which of the two Nature intended him. Crebillion has made a convention with me, which, if he is not too lazy, will be no bad
Page 142 - to try what could be done in furtherance thereof, I have no one to confult in this affair—therefore as a man may do worfe things, the Englifh of all which is this, that I am going to leave a few poor fheep here in the wildernefs for fourteen days—and from pride and
Page 22 - of Duennas to watch the workings of their humours, till they have fafely got through the whole work.—If this will not be fufficient, may we have plenty of Sangrados to pour in plenty of cold water, till this terrible fermentation is over —as for the nummum in loculo, which you mention to me a fecond time, I
Page 111 - ignorant of all pretending fools—I withdrew what was left of me out of their hands, and recommended my affairs entirely to Dame Nature—She (dear goddefs) has faved me in fifty different pinching bouts, and I begin to have a kind of enthufiafm now in her favour, and in my own, that one or two more efcapes will
Page 51 - cry for a peace is fo general, that it will certainly end in one. Now for myfelf. One half of the town abufe my book as bitterly, as the other half cry it up to the fkies—the beft is, they abufe and buy it, and at fuch a rate, that we are going on with a fecond edition, as

Bibliographic information