The Written Gospel

Front Cover
Markus Bockmuehl, Donald A. Hagner
Cambridge University Press, Jul 28, 2005 - Religion
This book comprehensively surveys the origin, production and reception of the canonical gospels in the early church. The discussion unfolds in three steps. Part One traces the origin of the 'gospel' of Jesus, its significance in Jewish and Hellenistic contexts of the first century, and its development from eyewitness memory to oral tradition and written text. Part Two then more specifically examines the composition, design and intentions of each of the four canonical gospels. Widening the focus, Part Three first asks about gospel-writing as viewed from the perspective of ancient Jews and pagans before turning to the question of reception history in the proliferation of 'apocryphal' gospels, in the formation of the canon, and in the beginnings of a gospel commentary tradition.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Q as oral tradition
45
I WRITING THE F O U R G O S P E
99
How Matthew writes
116
How Mark writes
139
How Luke writes
167
Judith Lieu
171
IO Beginnings and endings
184
I2 The Four among pagans
222
I3 Forty other gospels
238
I4 The One the Four and the many
254
I5 The making of gospel commentaries
274
Graham Stantons publications
296
Index of ancient sources
337
Index of authors
355
Copyright

The Four among Jews
205

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About the author (2005)

Markus Bockmuehl is Reader in New Testament Studies at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Fitzwilliam College. His publications include (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Jesus (2001).

Donald A. Hagner is the George Eldon Ladd Professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. His publications include commentaries on Matthew (1993) and Hebrews (1990).

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