The Youngest Science: Notes of a Medicine-Watcher

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Penguin Books, 1995 - Medical - 270 pages

From the 1920s when he watched his father, a general practitioner who made housecalls and wrote his prescriptions in Latin, to his days in medical school and beyond, Lewis Thomas saw medicine evolve from an art into a sophisticated science. The Youngest Science is Dr. Thomas's account of his life in the medical profession and an inquiry into what medicine is all about--the youngest science, but one rich in possibility and promise.

He chronicles his training in Boston and New York, his war career in the South Pacific, his most impassioned research projects, his work as an administrator in hospitals and medical schools, and even his experiences as a patient. Along the way, Thomas explores the complex relationships between research and practice, between words and meanings, between human error and human accomplishment, More than a magnificent autobiography, The Youngest Science is also a celebration and a warning--about the nature of medicine and about the future life of our planet.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

Thomas makes us realize how much the "practice" of medicine has changed over the years. In recounting many of the amazing breakthroughs, it also becomes apparent how much we take for granted. I ... Read full review

THE YOUNGEST SCIENCE: Notes Of A Medicine-watcher (alfred P. Sloan Foundation Series)

User Review  - Kirkus

Writing of his life and his scientific challenges, the author of The Lives of a Cell and The Medusa and the Snail displays the same unpretentious but erudite way with words that have made the essays ... Read full review

Contents

Amity Street
1
House Calls
12
Leech Leech Et Cetera
51
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Thomas was a physician, researcher, author, and teacher best known for his essays, which contain lucid meditations and reflections on a wide range of topics. He was a former dean of New York University Medical School and president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

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