Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency

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John Wiley & Sons, Feb 20, 2012 - Philosophy - 192 pages
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An expansive, yet succinct, analysis of the Philosophy of Religion – from metaphysics through theology. Organized into two sections, the text first examines truths concerning what is possible and what is necessary. These chapters lay the foundation for the book’s second part – the search for a metaphysical framework that permits the possibility of an ultimate explanation that is correct and complete.
  • A cutting-edge scholarly work which engages with the traditional metaphysician’s quest for a true ultimate explanation of the most general features of the world we inhabit
  • Develops an original view concerning the epistemology and metaphysics of modality, or truths concerning what is possible or necessary
  • Applies this framework to a re-examination of the cosmological argument for theism
  • Defends a novel version of the Leibnizian cosmological argument
 

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Contents

Modal Knowledge
32
Towards a Modal
41
The Spheres of Possibility
60
ix
86
5
111
10
117
The God of Abraham Isaac and Anselm?
130
Notes
145
27
147
Bibliography
162
Index
172
41
175
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About the author (2012)

Timothy O'Connor is Professor of Philosophy at Indiana University Bloomington. He has published widely in the areas of metaphysics, philosophy of mind and action, and philosophy of religion. He is the author of Persons and Causes (2000) and the editor of Agents, Causes, and Events: Essays on Indeterminism and Free Will (1995), Philosophy of Mind: Contemporary Readings (2003), Downward Causation And The Neurobiology Of Free Will (2009), Emergence in Science and Philosophy (2010) and A Companion to the Philosophy of Action (2010).

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