Theories Of Comparative Political Economy

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Westview Press, Nov 6, 2008 - Political Science - 331 pages
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Theories of Comparative Political Economy builds on the proposition that the study of politics and economics has evolved into political economy in a number of significant ways, and that the new issues and ideas that became prominent in the 1980s and 1990s will carry on into the new millennium. The book is organized around six chapters. In the first chapter Chilcote examines significant comparative historical themes, various schools of thinking, divergent theories, and relevant monographic literature and sensitive case studies in comparative political economy. In subsequent chapters Chilcote explores the question of transitions from feudalism to capitalism and capitalism to socialism, theories of class, theories of the state, theories of imperialism, and capitalist and socialist development. In the final chapter Chilcote discusses democracy from the perspective of political economy, describing its representative, indirect, and bourgeois participatory forms. This book is a sequel to Chilcote's Theories of Comparative Politics (1981), which was substantially revised and published in a second edition in 1994.
 

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Contents

III
1
IV
2
V
6
VI
13
VII
18
VIII
29
IX
45
X
46
XXI
148
XXII
163
XXIII
175
XXIV
177
XXV
203
XXVI
210
XXVII
219
XXVIII
229

XI
48
XII
66
XIII
89
XV
94
XVI
99
XVII
103
XVIII
117
XIX
133
XX
145
XXIX
232
XXX
253
XXXI
260
XXXII
267
XXXIII
272
XXXIV
293
XXXV
299
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Page 53 - The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended, either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes.
Page 49 - Constant revolutionizing of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions, are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned, and man is at last compelled to face, with sober senses, his real conditions...
Page 139 - Between capitalist and communist society lies the period of the revolutionary transformation of the one into the other. There corresponds to this also a political transition period in which the state can be nothing but the revolutionary dictatorship of the proletariat.
Page 140 - The state is, therefore, by no means a power forced on society from without; just as little is it 'the reality of the ethical idea,' 'the image and reality of reason,' as Hegel maintains. Rather, it is a product of society at a certain stage of development; it is the admission that this society has become entangled in an insoluble contradiction with itself, that it is cleft into irreconcilable antagonisms which it is powerless to dispel. But in order that these antagonisms, classes with conflicting...
Page 57 - England has to fulfil a double mission in India: one destructive, the other regenerating — the annihilation of old Asiatic society, and the laying of the material foundations of Western society in Asia.
Page 224 - By dependence we mean a situation in which the economy of certain countries is conditioned by the development and expansion of another economy to which the former is subjected. The relation of interdependence between two or more economies, and between these and world trade, assumes the form of dependence when some countries (the dominant ones) can expand and...
Page 138 - The executive of the modern state is but a committee for managing the common affairs of the whole bourgeoisie.
Page 139 - It follows from this that all struggles within the State, the struggle between democracy, aristocracy and monarchy, the struggle for the franchise, etc., etc., are merely the illusory forms in which the real struggles of the different classes are fought out among one another...
Page 140 - The state is the product and the manifestation of the irreconcilability of class antagonisms. The state arises when, where and to the extent that class antagonisms cannot be objectively reconciled.

About the author (2008)

Ronald H. Chilcote is professor of political science and economics at the University of California, Riverside. He is founder and managing editor of Latin American Perspectives and author and editor of numerous books and articles, including Theories of Development and Underdevelopment.

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