Theorizing Discrimination in an Era of Contested Prejudice: Discrimination in the United States

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Temple University Press, Aug 28, 2009 - Social Science - 296 pages

Despite several decades of attention, there is still no consensus on the effects of racial or sexual discrimination in the United States. In this landmark work, the well-known sociologist Samuel Lucas shows how discrimination is not simply an action that one person performs in relation to another individual, but something far more insidious: a pervasive dynamic that permeates the environment in which we live and work.

Challenging existing literature on the subject, Lucas makes a clear distinction between prejudice and discrimination. He maintains that when an era of “condoned exploitation” ended, the era of “contested prejudice,” as he terms it, began. He argues that the great strides made in the 1950s and 1960s repudiated prejudice, but not discrimination. Drawing on critical race theory, feminist theory, and a critique of dominant perspectives in the social sciences and law, Lucas offers a new understanding of racial and sexual discrimination that can guide our actions and laws into a more just future.

 

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Contents

Evidently
1
Fundamental Bases
8
2 Experiential Realities and Public Contestation
23
3 From Condoned Exploitive Relations to the Era of Contested Prejudice
53
Dominant Legal Perspectives
86
Critical Legal Perspectives and the Critique of the Dominant Legal View
103
An Asocial Scientific Method
143
7 Discrimination as a Damaged Social Relation
175
8 Epistemological Foundations for Studying Effects of Discrimination as a Social Relation
205
9 Theorizing Discrimination in an Era of Contested Prejudice
235
Commentary on Methods of Data Analysis for Chapter 2
251
Commentary on Simulation for Chapter 5
257
References
259
Index
275
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Samuel Roundfield Lucas is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Tracking Inequality: Stratification and Mobility in American High Schools and a co-author of Inequality By Design: Cracking the Bell Curve Myth.

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