Thin Plates and Shells: Theory: Analysis, and Applications

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CRC Press, Aug 24, 2001 - Science - 688 pages
3 Reviews
Presenting recent principles of thin plate and shell theories, this book emphasizes novel analytical and numerical methods for solving linear and nonlinear plate and shell dilemmas, new theories for the design and analysis of thin plate-shell structures, and real-world numerical solutions, mechanics, and plate and shell models for engineering applications. It includes computer processes for finite difference, finite element, boundary element, and boundary collocation methods as well as other variational and numerical methods. It also contains end-of-chapter examples and problem/solution sets, a catalog of solutions for cylindrical and spherical shells, and tables of the most commonly used plates and shells.
 

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This book is a good book to start the "Theory of Shell Structures". I will give it a 5 star for its lucid explanations.

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the explanations are very clear

Contents

THIN PLATES
1
12 History of Plate Theory Development
4
13 General Behavior of Plates
7
14 Survey of Elasticity Theory
8
References
14
The Fundamentals of the SmallDeflection Plate Bending Theory
17
23 Stresses Stress Resultants and Stress Couples
20
24 The Governing Equation for Deflections of Plates in Cartesian Coordinates
24
123 Statics of Shells
333
124 Strain Energy of Shells
340
125 Boundary Conditions
341
126 Discussion of the Governing Equations of the General Linear Shell Theory
344
127 Types of State of Stress for Thin Shells
346
Problems
347
The Membrane Theory of Shells
349
132 The Fundamental Equations of the Membrane Theory of This Shells
350

25 Boundary Conditions
27
26 Variational Formulation of Plate Bending Problems
36
Problems
41
References
42
Rectangular Plates
43
33 Naviers Method Double Series Solution
47
34 Rectangular Plates Subjected to a COncentrated Lateral Force P
54
35 Levys Solution Single Series Solution
60
36 Continuous Plates
71
37 Plates on an Elastic Foundation
76
38 Plates with Variable Stiffness
81
39 Rectangular Plates Under Combined Lateral and Direct Loads
84
310 Bending of Plates with Small Initial Curvature
88
Problems
90
References
92
Circular Plates
95
43 Axisymmetric Bending of Circular Plates
98
44 The Use of Superposition for the Axisymmetric Analysis of Circular Plates
109
45 Circular Plates on Elastic Foundation
113
46 Asymmetric Bending of Circular Plates
116
47 Circular Plates Loaded by an Eccentric Lateral Concentrated Force
119
48 Circular Plates of Variable Thickness
122
Problems
128
References
132
Bending of Plates of Various Shapes
133
53 SectorShaped Plates
135
54 Triangular Plates
137
55 Skew Plates
139
Problems
140
References
141
Plate Bending by Approximate and Numerical Methods
143
62 The Finite Difference Method FDM
144
63 The Boundary Collocation Method BCM
152
64 The Boundary Element Method BEM
156
65 The Galerkin Method
166
66 The Ritz Method
171
67 The Finite Element Method FEM
175
Problems
186
References
188
Advanced Topics
191
72 Orthotropic and Stiffened Plates
197
73 The Effect of Transverse Shear Deformation on the Bending of Elastic Plates
207
74 LargeDeflection Theory of Thin Plates
215
75 Multilayered Plates
231
76 Sandwich Plates
233
Problems
237
References
239
Buckling of Plates
241
83 The Equilibrium Method
245
84 The Energy Method
255
85 Buckling Analysis of Orthotropic and Stiffened Plates
259
86 Postbuckling Behavior of Plates
265
87 Buckling of Sandwich Plates
270
Problems
272
References
273
The Vibration of Plates
275
92 Free Flexural Vibrations of Rectangular Plates
276
93 Approximate Methods in Vibration Analysis
278
94 Free Flexural Vibrations of Circular Plates
284
95 Forced Flexural Vibrations of Plates
286
Problems
288
References
289
Introduction to the General Shell Theory
291
102 General Definitions and Fundamentals of Shells
293
103 Brief Outline of the Linear Shell Theories
294
104 LoadingCarrying Mechanism of Shells
299
References
300
Geometry of the Middle Surface
303
112 Principal Directions and Lines of Curvature
304
113 The First and Second Quadratic Forms of Surfaces
307
114 Principal Curvatures
310
115 Unit Vectors
311
116 Equations of Codazzi and Gauss Gaussian Curvature
312
117 Classification of Shell Surfaces
313
118 Specialization of Shell Geometry
316
Problems
324
The General Linear Theory of Shells
325
122 Kinematics of Shells
326
133 Applicability of The Membrane Theory
351
134 The Membrane Theory of Shells of Revolution
352
135 Symmetrically Loaded Shells of Revolution
356
136 Membrane Analysis of Cylindrical and Conical Shells
361
137 The Membrane Theory of Shells of an Arbitrary Shape in Cartesian Coordinates
368
Problems
371
References
372
Application of the Membrane Theory to the Analysis of Shell Structures
373
142 Membrane Analysis of Liquid Storage Facilities
390
143 Axisymmetric Pressure Vessels
402
Problems
405
References
409
Moment Theory of Circular Cylindrical Shells
411
152 Circular Cylindrical Shells Under General Loads
412
153 Axisymmetrically Loaded Circular Cylindrical Shells
421
154 Circular Cylindrical Shell of Variable Thickness Under Axisymmetric Loading
443
Problems
446
References
448
The Moment Theory of Shells of Revolution
449
162 Governing Equations
450
163 Shells of Revolution Under Axisymmetrical Loads
454
164 Approximate Method for Solution of the Governiing Equations 1630
460
165 Axisymmetric Spherical Shells Analysis of the State of Stress at the SphericaltoCylindrical Junction
464
166 Axisymmetrically Loaded Conical Shells
475
167 Axisymmetric Deformation of Toroidal Shells
478
Problems
479
References
481
Approximate Theories of Shell Analysis and Their Applications
483
173 The DonnelMushtariVlasov Theory of Thin SHells
494
174 Theory of Shallow Shells
497
175 The Theory of Edge Effect
507
Problems
511
References
514
Advanced Topics
515
182 The Geometrically Nonlinear Shell Theory
522
183 Orthotropic and Stiffened Shells
531
184 Multilayered Shells
538
185 Sandwich Shells
541
186 The Finite Element Representation of Shells
543
187 Approximate and Numerical Methods for Solution of Nonlinear Equations
553
Problems
561
References
562
Buckling of Shells
565
193 Linear Buckling Analysis of Circular Cylindrical Shells
573
194 Postbuckling Analysis of Circular Cylindrical Shells
585
195 Buckling of Orthotropic And Stiffened Cylindrical Shells
590
196 Stability of Cylindrical Sandwich Shells
595
197 Stability of Shallow Shells Under External Normal Pressure
597
198 Buckling of Conical Shells
599
199 Buckling of Spherical Shells
600
1910 Design Stability Analysis
602
Problems
606
References
607
Vibrations of Shells
609
202 Free Vibrations of Cylindrical Shells
610
203 Free Vibrations of Conical Shells
618
204 Free Vibrations of Shallow Shells
619
205 Free Vibrations of Stiffened Shells
622
206 Forced Vibrations of Shells
624
Problems
627
Some Reference Data
629
A1 Typical Properties of Selected Engineering Materials at Room Temperatures US Customary Units
630
A2 Typical Properties of Selected Engineering Materials at Room Temperatures International System SI Units
631
A3 Units and Conversion Factors
632
Fourier Series Expansion
635
B3 Coefficients of the Fourier Series
636
B5 The Order of the Fourier Series Coefficients
637
B6 Double Fourier Series
639
B7 Sharpening of Convergence of the Fourier Series
640
Verification of Relations of the Theory of Surfaces
641
C2 Geometry of a Surface
643
C3 Derivatives of Unit Coordinate Vectors
645
C4 Verification of Codazzi and Gauss Equations
649
Derivation of the StrainDisplacement Relations
651
D2 Strain Components of the Shell
653
Verification of Equilibrium Equations
655
Index
659
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