Third Force, The; The Rise of Transnational Civil Society

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From the landmines campaign to the Seattle protests against the WTO to the World Commission on Dams, transnational networks of civil society groups are seizing an ever-greater voice in how governments run countries and how corporations do business. This volume brings together a multinational group of authors to help policymakers, scholars, corporate executives, and activists themselves understand the profound issues raised. How powerful are these networks? Is their current prominence a temporary fluke or a permanent change in the nature of international power? What roles should they play as the world struggles to cope with the new global agenda? This book's six case studies investigate the role of transnational civil society in the global anti-corruption movement, nuclear arms control, dam-building and sustainability, democracy movements, landmines, and human rights. The conclusion draws out lessons learned and argues for a new understanding of the legitimate role of transnational civil
 

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Contents

What the World Needs Now?
1
A Global Network to Curb Corruption The Experience of Transparency International
17
Advocates and Activists Conflicting Approaches on Nonproliferation and the Test Ban Treaty
49
Toward Democratic Governance for Sustainable Development Transnational Civil Society Organizing Around Big Dams
83
Transnational Networks and Campaigns for Democracy
115
Building Partnerships toward a Common Goal Experiences of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines
143
The Power of Norms versus the Norms of Power Transnational Civil Society and Human Rights
177
Lessons Learned
211
Annotated Bibliography
241
Index
277
Contributors
293
Japan Center for International Exchange
294
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
295
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Page 22 - Organization (WTO), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the Organization of American States (OAS).

About the author (2000)

Ann Florini is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she directs the Transparency Civil Society Project.

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