This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation

Front Cover
Gloria Anzald˙a, AnaLouise Keating
Psychology Press, 2002 - Social Science - 608 pages
Over twenty years after the ground-breaking anthology This Bridge Called My Back challenged feminists to envision new forms of communities and practices, Gloria E. Anzald˙a and AnaLouise Keating have brought together an ambitious new collection of over eighty original contributions offering a bold new vision of women-of-color consciousness for the twenty-first century. Through personal narratives, theoretical essays, textual collage, poetry, letters, artwork and fiction, this bridge we call home examines and extends the discussion of issues at the center of the first Bridge such as classism, homophobia, racism, identity politics, and community building, while exploring the additional issues of third wave feminism, Native sovereignty, lesbian pregnancy and mothering, transgendered issues, Arab-American stereotyping, Jewish identities, spiritual activism, and surviving academe. Written by women and men - both 'of color' and 'white,' located inside and outside the United States - and motivated by a desire for social justice, this bridge we call home invites feminists of all colors and genders to develop new forms of transcultural dialogues, practices, and alliances. Building on and pushing forward the revolutionary call for transformation announced over two decades ago, this bridge we call home, will challenge readers to rethink existing categories and invent new individual and collective identities.--Publisher's description.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review  - Overstock.com

My product arrived a lot earlier than i expected. The book was in a perfect condition and I saved so much at the same time. I am so glad that I bought my product from here than buying it from somewhere else. Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

As a man of color, this book is probably one of the most profound books available. Similar to bridge called my back, way ahead of its time!

Contents

II
8
III
8
IV
21
VI
28
VII
42
IX
50
XI
53
XIII
59
LXXIII
301
LXXIV
304
LXXVI
313
LXXVII
314
LXXIX
325
LXXXI
330
LXXXIII
339
LXXXV
341

XIV
62
XV
69
XVII
77
XIX
81
XXI
104
XXII
106
XXIV
110
XXVI
116
XXVIII
117
XXX
126
XXXII
136
XXXIV
137
XXXVI
145
XXXVIII
155
XL
158
XLI
165
XLIII
176
XLV
181
XLIX
192
LI
202
LII
208
LIV
223
LVI
232
LVII
239
LIX
254
LXI
258
LXIII
267
LXV
277
LXVI
286
LXVIII
287
LXX
293
LXXI
295
LXXXVI
358
LXXXVIII
369
XC
372
XCII
381
XCIV
390
XCVII
391
XCIX
397
C
403
CIII
415
CV
433
CVII
440
CIX
450
CXII
458
CXIV
463
CXV
470
CXVII
473
CXVIII
483
CXIX
486
CXXI
496
CXXIII
506
CXXV
510
CXXVIII
517
CXXIX
519
CXXXI
530
CXXXIV
539
CXXXV
540
CXXXVII
579
CXXXVIII
593
CXXXIX
602
CXL
603
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Gloria E. Anzald˙a is a self-described tejana patlache (queer) nepantlera spiritual activist and has played a pivotal role in defining U.S. feminisms, Chicano/a issues, ethnic studies, and queer theory. Her book Borderlands/La frontera: The New Mestiza was selected as one of the 100 best books of the century by HungryMind Review and the Utne Reader.
AnaLouise Keating is a nepantlera, spiritual activist, and associate professor of Women's Studies at Texas Women's University. She is the author of Women Reading Women Writing and has published articles on critical race theory, queer theory, and Latina and African American women writers.

Bibliographic information