“This, the Autumn of our Life” by Frederick W. Corlett: “Reflections at the End of Life’s Journey”

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Traillblazer Bookshop - Religion - 62 pages
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This book is addressed primarily to older people who have reached, or are drawing close to the end of their lives. But a younger person ought not to set it aside disdainfully, saying, “This has nothing to do with me”. It has much to do with you, because what I am, you will be, and it will come upon you much more quickly than you think. An old song used to say, “Enjoy yourself; it’s later than you think”. I would change that sentiment slightly, and say, “Get right with God; it’s later than you think”.

But right now I want to address older people who have seen many tears and sorrows, as well as joys and blessings along their way, and it is when we when “we get to the end of our journey” that we come to the firm conclusion that it was worth it all, the tears and sorrows as well as the joys and blessings.

 

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Contents

Section 1
28
Section 2
30
Section 3
32
Section 4
33
Section 5
52
Copyright

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About the author

 

Foreword

Many will recognize that the title of this book is taken from Gilbert and Sullivan’s, “Yeomen of the Guard”, where the aging yeomen express their ongoing desire to continue serving their King and country.

This, the autumn of our lives;

This, the evening of our days;

Weary, we of battle strife

Weary we of mortal fray

Still would fight the foreign foe,

As in days of long ago; as in days of long ago….

The sub-title is taken from the Christian song, “He’ll understand and say, ‘Well done’

If, when you give the best of your service,

Telling the world that the Saviour has come,

Be not dismayed if men don’t believe you.

He’ll understand and say, ‘Well done’

Then when we come to the end of our journey,

Weary of life and the battle all done,

Bearing the cross and staff of redemption,

He’ll understand and say, ‘Well done’

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