Thomas Jefferson as an Architect and a Designer of Landscapes

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Houghton Mifflin, 1913 - Architecture - 121 pages
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Page 87 - I was violently smitten with the Hotel de Salm, and used to go to the Tuileries almost daily, to look at it. The loueuse des chaises, inattentive to my passion, never had the complaisance to place a chair there, so that, sitting on the parapet, and twisting my neck round to see the object of my admiration, I generally left it with a torti-colli.
Page 86 - The stocking weavers and silk spinners around it consider me a hypochondriac Englishman, about to write with a pistol the last chapter of his history. This is the second time I have been in love since I left Paris. The first was with a Diana at the Chateau de Laye-Epinaye in Beaujolois, a delicious morsel of sculpture, by MA Slodtz.
Page 1 - Pavilions about 36. f. wide in front, and 24. f. in depth. . . . The whole of the pavilions and dormitories to be united by a colonnade in front, of the height of the lower story of the pavilions and about 8 f.
Page 87 - ... for Gothic windows, and hewed down, in the residue, to the plane of the building, was enough, you must admit, to disturb my composure. At Orange too, I thought of you. I was sure you had seen with pleasure, the sublime triumphal arch of Marius at the entrance of the city. I went then to the Arenae.
Page 86 - Here I am, Madam, gazing whole hours at the Maison Quarre'e, like a lover at his mistress. The stocking weavers and silk spinners around it consider me a hypochondriac Englishman, about to write with a pistol the last chapter of his history. This is the second time I have been in love since I left Paris. The first was with a Diana at the Chateau de Laye-Epinaye in...
Page 87 - ... used to go to the Tuileries almost daily, to look at it. The loueuse des chaises, inattentive to my passion, never had the complaisance to place a chair there, so that, sitting on the parapet, and twisting my neck round to see the object of my admiration, I generally left it with a torti-colli. From Lyons to Nismes I have been nourished with the remains of Roman grandeur.
Page 86 - Beaujolais, a delicious morsel of sculpture by MA Slodtz. This, you will say, was in rule, to fall in love with a female beauty; but with a house! it is out of all precedent. No, Madam, it is not without a precedent in my own history. While in Paris I was violently smitten with the Hotel de Salm, and used to go to the Tuileries almost daily to look at it.
Page 17 - Mr. Jefferson is the first American who has consulted the fine arts to know how he should shelter himself from the weather.
Page 87 - Quarrel — defaced by the barbarians who have converted it to its present purpose, its beautiful, fluted Corinthian columns cut out, in part, to make space for Gothic windows, and hewed down, in the residue, to the plane of the building, was enough, you must admit, to disturb my composure.
Page 78 - We owed to it to do, not what was to perish with ourselves, but what would remain, be respected and preserved through other ages. And we fondly hope that the instruction which may flow from this institution, kindly cherished, by advancing the minds of our youth with the growing science of the times...

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