Thomas Jefferson, the Man of Letters

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Priv. print. [Press of S. Thompson], 1891 - 73 pages
 

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Page 7 - HERE WAS BURIED THOMAS JEFFERSON, Author of the Declaration of American Independence, Of the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, And Father of the University of Virginia ; because by these, as testimonials that I have lived, I wish most to be remembered.
Page 42 - I have been fifty years making it, and have spared no pains, opportunity, or expense, to make it what it is. While residing in Paris I devoted every afternoon I was disengaged, for a summer or two, in examining all the principal bookstores, turning over every book with my own hands, and putting by every thing which related to America, and, indeed, whatever was rare and valuable in every science...
Page 23 - Be content to bind America by laws of trade ; you have always done it. Let this be your reason for binding their trade. Do not burden them by taxes ; you were not used to do so from the beginning. Let this be your reason for not taxing. These are the arguments of states and kingdoms. Leave the rest to the schools ; for there only they may be discussed with safety.
Page 64 - Here was buried THOMAS JEFFERSON, Author of the Declaration of American Independence, of The Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and Father of the University of Virginia.
Page 23 - I am not here going into the distinctions of rights, nor attempting to mark their boundaries. I do not enter into these metaphysical distinctions. I hate the very sound of them. Leave the Americans as they anciently stood, and these distinctions, born of our unhappy contest, will die along with it. They and...
Page 70 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, etlua% free, cannot live in the same government.
Page 23 - Again, and again, revert to your old principles — seek peace and ensue it — leave America, if she has taxable matter in her, to tax herself. I am not here going into the distinctions of rights, nor attempting to mark their boundaries. I do not enter into these metaphysical distinctions ; I hate the very sound of them.
Page 18 - Mr. Jefferson came into Congress, in June, 1775, and brought with him a reputation for literature, science, and a happy talent of composition. Writings of his were handed about, remarkable for the peculiar felicity of expression.
Page 39 - Latin languages are, first, as models of pure taste in writing. To these we are certainly indebted for the national and chaste style of modern composition which so much distinguishes the nations to whom these languages are familiar. Without these models we should probably have continued the inflated style of our northern ancestors, or the hyperbolical and vague one of the east.
Page 63 - HERE WAS BURIED THOMAS JEFFERSON, AUTHOR OF THE DECLARATION OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE, OF THE STATUTE OF VIRGINIA FOR RELIGIOUS FREEDOM, AND FATHER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ; because by these, as testimonials that I have lived, I wish most to be remembered.

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