Threadsuns

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Sun & Moon Press, 2000 - Poetry - 272 pages
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Threadsuns was composed between September 1965 and June 1967. If Breathturn-previously published by Sun & Moon Press-was the opening gambit of Celan's "turn," the entry into the late work, then Threadsuns, the volume of his poetry that has recevied the least attention, may be said to be not only an extension or continuation of the previous volume, but the full blown realization of Celan's late work. One of the great poets of the 20th century, Paul Celan is the author of numerous books of poetry, among them Breathturn (now published by Green Integer) and Lightduress, which will be published by Sun & Moon Press in an upcoming season.

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Contents

Introduction
13
Augenblickei
30
Sichtbar
44
Hendaye
56
Lyon les archers
69
Schlafbrocken
84
Ausgeschliipfte
90
Whitesounds
103
Late
167
Die Samlinge
168
The seedlings
169
Die Hiigelzeilen endang
170
Along the hill lines
171
Komm
172
Come
173
Entschlackt
174

Die kollidierenden
116
Eingewohntentwohnt
124
Hullen
138
Die Eine
152
Bei Gliih und Miihwein
154
By mulled and toiled wine
155
Schief
156
Aslant
157
Die Herzschriftgekrumelte
158
The heartscriptcrumbled
159
Unverwahrt
160
Unkept
161
Das unbedingte Gelaut
162
The unconditional chiming
163
Die Ewigkeit
164
Eternity
165
Spat
166
Deslagged
175
Seelenblind
176
Soulblind
177
Anrainerin
178
Borderess
179
Mowenkiicken
180
Gullchicks
181
Irisch
184
You with the
197
Aortenbogen
210
Weil du den Notscherben fandst
214
Verwaist
228
Der Schweigestoss
242
Haut Mai
244
Denk dir
258
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Paul Celan was born in 1920 in Czernowitz, Romania, to Jewish parents, who spoke German in the home. His mother and father were both deported to concentration camps during Nazi occupation and killed. Celan managed to hide for some time and then survived the war in a Romanian detention camp. After the war, he worked for a time as an editor and translator; he went to Paris to lecture on German literature. Celan began to receive recognition as a poet with the publication of his volume Mohn und Gedachtnis (Poppy and Memory) in 1952 and continued to publish steadily until his suicide in 1970. Divided between conflicting loyalties and cultures, Celan created a unique idiom. Despite the traumatic experience of Nazi occupation, he chose to devote himself to the study of German literature. His poetry is one of the most radical attempts to reconstruct the German language and literature in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

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