Three Faiths, One God: The Formative Faith and Practice of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

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BRILL, Jan 1, 2002 - Religion - 329 pages
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If Moses, Jesus, and the Prophet Muhammad were to meet, what would they tell one another about Judaism, Christianity, and Islam? Three of today's leading scholars explore the topics such a conversation might entail in this comparative study of the three monotheistic faiths. In systematic, side-by-side descriptions, they detail the classical theologies of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and the authoritative writings that convey those theologies-Torah, Bible, and Qur'?n. They then compare and contrast the three faiths, which, though distinct and autonomous, address a common set of issues. While asserting that this book is by no means a background source for issues and conflicts among contemporary followers of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, the authors nevertheless aspire to reveal among the three a common potential for mutual understanding. This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
 

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Contents

THE CLASSICAL
1
The Bible Old
13
The Quran and Prophetic
23
THE PERSON OF GOD
36
GODS PEOPLE
99
THE HOLY WAY OF LIFE
161
THE BELIEVERS AND THE UNBELIEVERS
208
THE END OF DAYS
255
INDEX OF SCRIPTURE AND ANCIENT SOURCES
309
INDEX OF SUBJECTS
322
INDEX OF MODERN AUTHORS
328
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About the author (2002)

Jacob Neusner is Research Professor of Religion and Theology and Senior Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Theology at Bard College. Bruce Chilton is Professor of Hebrew Bible and New Testament at Bard College. William Graham is Murray A. Albertson Professor of Middle Eastern studies and Dean Professor of the History of Religion at Harvard University. He is also Dean of Harvard Divinity School.

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