Three Months in the Southern States: April-June, 1863

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J. Bradburn (successor to M. Doolady), 1864 - Confederate States of America - 309 pages
This book contains the experiences and travels of the author, a British Army officer and a notable witness to the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War. He spent three months (from 2 April until 16 July 1863) in North America, travelling through parts of the Confederate States of America and the Union.
 

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Page 217 - Willcox (an officer who wears a short round jacket and a battered straw hat) come up to him, and explain, almost crying, the state of his brigade. General Lee immediately shook hands with him and said cheerfully, "Never mind, General, all this has been MY fault — it is I that have lost this fight, and you must help me out of it in the best way you can.
Page 215 - Longstreet turned upon him and replied, with some sarcasm, * Very well ; never mind, then, General; just let them remain where they are; the enemy's going to advance, and will spare you the trouble.' " He asked for something to drink ; I gave him some rum out of my silver flask, which I begged he would keep in remembrance of the occasion ; he smiled, and, to my great satisfaction, accepted the memorial. He then went off to give some orders to McLaw's division.
Page 216 - ... to the rear. His face, which is always placid and cheerful, did not show signs of the slightest disappointment, care, or annoyance ; and he was addressing to every soldier he met a 320 ANECDOTES, POETRY, AND INCIDENTS.
Page 213 - I determined to make my way to General Longstreet. It was then about 2.30. After passing General Lee THE BEPUL8B. 265 and his Staff, I rode on through the woods in the direction in which I had left Longstreet. I soon began to meet many wounded men returning from the front; many of them asked in piteous tones the way to a doctor or an ambulance. The further I got, the greater became the number of the wounded. At last I came to a perfect stream of them flocking through the woods in numbers as great...
Page 214 - The devil you wouldn't! I would like to have missed it very much; we've attacked and been repulsed; look there!" For the first time I then had a view of the open space between the two positions and saw it covered with Confederates, slowly and sulkily returning toward us in small broken parties, under a heavy fire of artillery.
Page 216 - His face, which is always placid and cheerful, did not show signs of the slightest disappointment, care, or annoyance; and he was addressing to every soldier he met a few words of encouragement, such as, " All this will come right in the end: we'll talk it over afterwards; hut, in the mean time, all good men must rally. We want all good and true men just now,
Page 212 - We then turned round and changed our views with regard to the cupola — the fire of one side being bad enough, but preferable .to that of both sides. A small boy of twelve years was riding with us at the time: this urchin took a diabolical interest in the bursting of the shells, and screamed with delight when he saw them take effect. I never saw this boy again, or found out who he was.
Page 197 - The relations between him and Longstreet are quite touching — they are almost always together. Longstreet's corps complain of this sometimes, as they say that they seldom get a chance of detached service, which falls to the lot of Ewell. It is impossible to please Longstreet more than by praising Lee. I believe these two generals to be as little ambitious and as thoroughly unselfish as any men in the world.
Page 208 - So soon as the firing began, General Lee joined Hill just below our tree, and he remained there nearly all the time, looking through his field-glass — sometimes talking to Hill and sometimes to Colonel Long of his Staff. But generally he sat quite alone on the stump of a tree. What I remarked especially was, that during the whole time the firing continued, he only sent one message, and only received one report. It is evidently his system to arrange the plan thoroughly with the three corps...
Page 215 - I remember seeing a General (Pettigrew, I think it was) come up to him, and report that ' he was unable to bring his men up again." Longstreet turned upon him and replied, with some sarcasm, ' Very well ; never mind, then, General j just let them remain where they are ; the enemy's going to advance, and will spare you the trouble.

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