Through ebony eyes: what teachers need to know but are afraid to ask about African American students

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Jossey-Bass, Apr 16, 2004 - Education - 328 pages
Fifty years after the Brown v. Board of Education decision was handed down from the Supreme Court, schools are still grappling with issues pertaining to race, ethnicity, diversity, and multiculturalism.

In this book, Gail L. Thompson takes on the volatile topic of the role of race in education and explores the black-white achievement gap and the cultural divide that exists between some teachers and African American students. Solidly based on research conducted with 175 educators, Through Ebony Eyes provides information and strategies that will help teachers increase their effectiveness with African American students. Written in conversational language, Through Ebony Eyes offers a wealth of examples and personal stories that clearly demonstrate the cultural differences that exist in the schools and offers a three-part, long-term professional development plan that will help teachers become more effective.

Through Ebony Eyes tackles real-life problems in schools and explains why some African American students misbehave in class and how teachers often unwittingly contribute to their misbehavior. Examples from a variety of classrooms and Thompson's own personal story of transformation clearly show how it is possible for a teacher to reach African American students and what it takes to become a powerful and influential life-changing teacher.

Through Ebony Eyes revisits the controversial topic of whether or not teachers should force African American students to speak Standard English in class and includes recommendations on motivating African American students to acquire Standard English skills without silencing them or devaluing their "home" language. The book offers practical advice on whether teachers should allow African American students to call each other the "N" word and offers suggestions on how to handle students' accusations of racism.

This important resource offers teachers, administrators, and student-teachers much-needed guidance for closing the cultural gap and providing sensitive but rigorous and effective educational experiences for their African American students.

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Contents

Persistent Problems
1
If African American Kids Arent Dumb or Lazy
13
How Can Teachers Reach African American Students
109
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Gail L. Thompson is associate professor of education at Claremont Graduate University. Her research has focused on the schooling experiences of students of color. She is the author of African American Teens Discuss Their Schooling Experiences and What African American Parents Want Educators to Know, as well as numerous journal articles.

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