Time Has Its Own Terms

Front Cover
Xlibris Corporation, Nov 30, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 157 pages

Time Has Its Own Terms is a collection of "common man" essays by Thomas Kiske, most of which do not suck. Some of them are poignant, others downright funny. Although they have won no major awards yet (let's face it, no minor ones either) it's probably because they don't use big words or foreign phrases. Instead, these are true-to-life tales drawn from Kiske's background growing up in inner city St. Louis in the Fifties and struggling to make sense of life over the ensuing half-century. The essays reflect the changes America's heartland has witnessed in the last half of the Twentieth Century - in its neighborhoods, its complexity and its values.

Mr. Kiske's essays, which have appeared in publications as diverse as The Houston Chronicle, Texas Magazine, The Soulard Rennaissance, the Baywatcher and InforMensa help us remember what it was like to be a kid before Little League, suburbs and soccer Moms. They also bring home the problems faced by ordinary people, as well as reminding us of life's simple pleasures.

If you read this stuff, you might like some of it. Of course, there are no guarantees.

 

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Contents

1 Chapter One
9
2 Chapter Two
17
3 Chapter Three
20
4 Chapter Four
25
5 Chapter Five
30
6 Chapter Six
35
7 Chapter Seven
39
8 Chapter Eight
43
16 Chapter Sixteen
89
17 Chapter Seventeen
95
18 Chapter Eighteen
101
19 Chapter Nineteen
106
20 Chapter Twenty
111
21 Chapter Twentyone
116
22 Chapter Twentytwo
122
23 Chapter Twentythree
129

9 Chapter Nine
49
10 Chapter Ten
55
11 Chapter Eleven
61
12 Chapter Twelve
71
13 Chapter Thirteen
76
14 Chapter Fourteen
79
15 Chapter Fifteen
82
24 Chapter Twentyfour
136
25 Chapter Twentyfive
142
26 Chapter Twentysix
147
27 Chapter Twentyseven
152
Photographs
157
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Thomas Kiske grew up in the Soulard area of inner-city St. Louis, where many of these essays find their home. Although he has traveled far from there in place and time, the old neighborhood will always be his home.

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