Time Management

Front Cover
McGraw Hill Professional, Mar 22, 2003 - Business & Economics - 180 pages
2 Reviews

Effective time management is one of today's most overlooked--yet essential --keys to career growth in business and management. Time Management provides hands-on techniques and tools for making every minute count as it dispels myths that can actually cost instead of save valuable time. It helps managers match the right time-saving tool to each situation, reveals secrets for anticipating instead of reacting, and explains how any manager can eliminate procrastination.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Taming Time
1
2 A Few Myths About Managing Your Time
14
Prioritize
29
The Thief of Time
42
5 Rocks Blocks Goals and Clusters
56
6 How to Delegate Effectively
69
7 Learning to Say No
81
8 The Art of Anticipating
93
9 Plugging Time Leaks
113
10 Power Tools for Time Management
132
Index
158
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - To realize the value of ONE MONTH, ask a mother who gave birth to a premature baby. To realize the value of ONE WEEK, ask the editor of a weekly newspaper. To realize the value of ONE HOUR, ask the lovers who are waiting to meet. To realize the value of ONE MINUTE, ask a person who missed the train.
Page 58 - Okay, time for a quiz." Then he pulled out a one-gallon, wide-mouthed Mason jar and set it on the table in front of him. Then he produced about a dozen fist-sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a time, into the jar. When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, "Is this jar full?
Page 59 - The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard you can always fit some more things in it! ' 'No, the speaker replied, 'that's not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is: If you don't put the big rocks in first, you'll never get them in at all.
Page 8 - Ask a student who has failed a final exam. To realize the value of one month: Ask a mother who has given birth to a premature baby. To realize the value of one week: Ask an editor of a weekly newspaper. To realize the value of one hour: Ask the lovers who are waiting to meet. To realize the value of one minute: Ask the person who has missed the train, bus or plane.
Page 6 - Its name is TIME. Every morning, it credits you with 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off, as lost, whatever of this you have failed to invest to good purpose. It carries over no balance.
Page 58 - Is the jar full?" By this time, the class was on to him. "Probably not," one of them answered. "Good!" he replied. He reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in the jar and it went into all of the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, "Is this jar full?
Page 59 - What is the point of this illustration?" One eager beaver raised his hand and said, "The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard, you can always fit some more things in it!
Page 46 - ... maintain their independence. As disabled people, our staff know first hand the terrible alienation and feelings of helplessness long term patients experience in hospitals and nursing homes. Mo matter how strong we may be, there are circumstances that can make all of us vulnerable, and in need of advocacy. If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you may be in need of patient advocacy. If so, please fill out the attached application. If you wish, a patient advocate will cal 1 on you...
Page 59 - No!' the class shouted. Once again he said, 'Good!' Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked up at the class and asked, 'What is the point of this illustration?
Page 21 - On the other hand, there are people who are virtually reverse, mirror images of a Type A. Let's call them Type M. They're quiet but commanding achievers. Their goals are reasonable, their schedules balanced, their dispositions even-tempered. Colleagues and friends admire them for getting things done. And they seem to suffer less from the recurring ills that...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Marc Mancini, Ph.D. is a professor at West Los Angeles College and operates Marc Mancini Seminars and Consulting, the travel industry's largest provider of industry training.

Bibliographic information