Time and the Astrolabe in the Canterbury Tales

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University of Oklahoma Press, 2002 - Poetry - 350 pages
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Marijane Osborn demonstrates that Chaucer structured the Canterbury Tales after the astrolabe, an Arabic Islamic time-keeping device. Chaucer’s fascination with this device also accounts for the sense of time and astronomy in the Tales.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Chaucers Sky
11
The Steed of Brass and Chaucers Astrolabe
34
Using the Astrolabe on the Road to Canterbury
55
in The Squires Tale
73
Mercury the Sly and the Bradshaw Shift
88
IX
95
The Amphitheater in The Knights Tale
123
Ptolemaic Order
158
Cosmic Retribution in The Millers Tale
177
Chaucers Attitude toward Prophecy
195
The Artificial Day of Pilgrimage
220
Libra and the Moon Some Final Speculations
244
A Practice Astrolabe
271
Notes
279
Works Cited
325

Taurus Rising
146
The Spheres and Pagan Prayer in The Knights Tale
153

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About the author (2002)

Marijane Osborn is Professor of English at the University of California at Davis. She is the author of Romancing the Goddess: Three Middle English Romancing about Women as well as coauthor or translator of six other books.

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