Titles of Honor

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1672 - History - 790 pages
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Selden, John. Titles of Honor. Carefully Corrected With Additions and Amendments by the Author. London: E. Tyler and R. Holt, 1672. [xxxiv], 756 pp. Copperplate portrait frontispiece. Text illustrated with woodcuts and copperplate engravings. [xxxiv], 756 pp. (9" x 12"). With a new introduction by Stephen M. Sheppard. Reprint available August 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-410-X. Cloth. $195. * Reprint of the third edition. With a eulogy by Ben Jonson. Bibliographical references in margins. Selden's [1584-1654] great historical work on nobility begins with a general discussion of titles and nobility. The following chapters consider the nobility of ancient Greece and Rome, Europe, the British Isles, the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox Churches, the Middle East and Asia. The final chapters survey various aspects of ceremony and precedence. First published in 1614, this work went through three editions. The third is the best as it contains substantial additions. The text is complemented with numerous illustrations of court dress, insignia and maps.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
11
III
22
IV
33
V
45
VI
63
VII
87
VIII
107
XI
396
XII
464
XIII
491
XIV
693
XV
698
XVI
705
XVII
724
XVIII
732

IX
221
X
380
XIX
740
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Page 18 - Where by divers sundry old authentic histories and chronicles it is manifestly declared and expressed that this realm of England is an empire, and so hath been accepted in the world, governed by one Supreme Head and King having the dignity and royal estate of the imperial Crown of the same...
Page vii - Was trusted, that you thought my judgment such To ask it : though, in most of works, it be A penance where a man may not be free, Rather than office ; when it doth, or may Chance, that the friend's affection proves allay Unto the censure. Your's all need doth fly Of this so vicious humanity ; Than which, there is not unto study a more Pernicious enemy. We see before A many...

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