To Kill a Mockingbird

Front Cover
HarperCollinsPublishers, 1995 - Fiction - 323 pages
2645 Reviews
"Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird". A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel - a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with rich humor and unswerving honesty the irrationality of adult attitudes toward race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence, and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina and quiet heroism of one man's struggle for justice. But the weight of history will only tolerate so much. Harper-Collins is proud to celebrate the thirty-fifth anniversary of the book's publication with this special hardcover edition featuring a new foreword by the author.

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Review: To Kill a Mockingbird (To Kill a Mockingbird)

User Review  - Suraya (thesuraya) - Goodreads

NOW I CAN PROUDLY SAY IVE READ TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. That's an achievement in itself :p Told from the perspective of a 9 years old little girl, it surely made the story different. If it was told from ... Read full review

Review: To Kill a Mockingbird (To Kill a Mockingbird)

User Review  - Veiledhorizon - Goodreads

It's such a beautiful tale about the lives of families living in Maycomb! This book dealt with racism too and that all races deserve equality. I really loved all the characters! They were realistic. This truly felt like a real story. Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Nelle Harper Lee was born in Monroeville, Alabama on April 28, 1926. She studied law at the University of Alabama from 1945 to 1949, and spent a year as an exchange student in Oxford University, Wellington Square. She moved to New York where she worked as an airlines reservations clerk while pursuing a literary career. In 1959, she accompanied Truman Capote to Holcombe, Kansas, as a research assistant for Capote's novel In Cold Blood. Her first book, To Kill a Mockingbird, was published in 1960 and won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1961. The book was adapted as a feature film in 1962 and a London stage play in 1987. Her second book, Go Set a Watchman, was published in 2015. She died on February 19, 2016 at the age of 89.

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