To tell a free story: the first century of Afro-American autobiography, 1760-1865

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University of Illinois Press, 1986 - Biography & Autobiography - 353 pages
To Tell A Free Story traces in unprecedented detail the history of black America's most innovative literary tradition--the autobiography--from its beginnings to the end of the slavery era.

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To tell a free story: the first century of Afro-American autobiography, 1769-1865

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Andrews describes and analyzes many autobiographies here, but his primary focus is on "slave narratives'' by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs (a.k.a. Linda Brent), and J. D. Green. He convincingly ... Read full review

Contents

Voices of the First Fifty Years 17601810
32
Experiments in Two Modes 181040
61
The Performance of Slave Narrative in the 1840s
97
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

William L. Andrews is E. Maynard Adams Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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