To walk in beauty: a Navajo family's journey home

Front Cover
Museum of New Mexico Press, Apr 1, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 198 pages
To Walk in Beauty takes readers on the journey of the Begay family of Jeddito Wash, Arizona, on the Navajo Reservation. This is an intimate portrait of a family's decision to reclaim its cultural identity. The book highlights in intensely personal terms the sense of cultural dissolution long associated with the tragedy of Navajo history, and it examines the spiritual healing that can take place when cultural identity is reclaimed.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Section 1
36
Section 2
50
Section 3
68
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

A member of the Kiowa tribe, Momaday was born in Oklahoma but grew up on reservations in the Southwest. He was educated at the University of New Mexico and Stanford University, and later taught at Berkeley, Stanford, and the University of Arizona. Momaday lives two lives as a professor of English and Comparative Literature and as a Kiowa tribal dancer and recorder of the Native American experience in this country. "None but an Indian, I think," he has said, "knows so much what it is like to have existence in two worlds and security in neither." This is a theme that runs through his fiction and nonfiction, including his Pulitzer prize winning first novel, House Made of Dawn (1968). Yet, as a Native American and a writer, Momaday finds two sources of identity the land and the language. The former gives strength to the American Indian, whose sense of identification comes from a closeness to the land. The latter connects humankind to ourselves and our world. "Man's idea of himself" finds "old and essential being in language," Momaday has written. Acts of naming, of remembering these are "legendary as well as historical, personal as well as cultural.