Total Facilities Management

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Sep 8, 2009 - Technology & Engineering - 328 pages
1 Review
Earlier editions of Total Facilities Management have been praised for the lucid presentation style and direct applicability of its contents. The third edition follows in that tradition, providing an accessible text bridging the gap between the theory of facilities management and its implementation. This book raises issues which all practitioners should consider before embarking on a particular plan, showing the link between facilities management practice and an organisation's business objectives and dealing with issues known to concern practitioners.

Building on the success and popularity of previous editions, the third edition adds new chapters on facilities planning, building intelligence, managing specialist services and information systems management, and provides a number of new, international case studies which will further broaden its appeal to practitioners and advanced students alike.

From a Review of the Second Edition:

“I have just finished reading this superb book and am impressed with the amount of ‘wisdom’ provided in a very readable form”
W.W. Badger, Arizona State University, in Construction Management and Economics

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Background to Facilities Management
1
Origin
2
Defining facilities management
4
Approaches to facilities management
5
Concept of best value
7
Matters of risk
9
Conclusions
11
2 Developing a Strategy for Facilities Management
12
Work environment
138
Environmental factors having an impact on productivity
139
Design implications
141
Unconventional working arrangements
142
Conclusions
143
12 Building Intelligence and Smart Systems
145
Introduction
146
Intelligent buildings Smart buildings
147

Introduction
13
Developing a facilities management strategy
14
Strategic analysis of facilities requirements
15
Developing solutions
19
Strategy implementation
20
Relationships between client organisations and service providers
23
Conclusions
28
3 Facilities Planning
30
Introduction
31
Space management
32
Design briefing
34
Facilities management brief
35
Postoccupancy evaluations
38
Real estate options
39
Totally serviced workplaces
40
Conclusions
41
4 Retaining Services InHouse vs Outsourcing
43
Attributes of service
44
Uniqueness of service
45
Priority flexibility and speed of response
46
Management implications and indirect cost
47
Direct cost
48
Overview of options and implications
50
Market testing
51
Conclusions
52
5 Change Management
54
Change in an organisational setting
55
Managing change in practice
56
Communicating change
59
Responsibilities of those managing change
60
Resolving cultural conflict
61
Conclusions
64
6 Human Resources Management
66
Dealing with shifting demands for resources
67
Employment obligations
72
Functions job descriptions and skills
76
Performance appraisal
77
Conclusions
79
7 Policy and Procedures for Outsourcing
81
Essential approach
82
Strategy
84
Tender documents
87
Tendering process
89
Ongoing relationships
93
Conclusions
94
8 Policy and Procedures for InHouse Provision
96
Definition of services
97
Inhouse capabilities and skills
98
Service provision reviewed and improved
99
Conclusions
100
9 Service Specifications Service Level Agreements and Performance
101
Introduction
102
Rationale for service specifications and SLAs
103
Example of a service specification cleaning of openplan offices
105
What is a service level agreement SLA?
107
Example of a service level agreement SLA
109
Critical success factors and key performance indicators
110
Performance monitoring
113
Updating service specifications and SLAs
116
Quality system
117
Conclusions
118
10 Health Safety and Environment
119
Sustainability and environmental issues
120
Relevant legislation
121
Corporate social responsibility
122
Organisation and administration
123
Workers rights
124
Safety rules and practice
125
Stress employees and the organisation
128
Conclusions
130
11 Workplace Productivity
132
Measuring productivity
133
Work itself
134
The organisation
136
Communication
137
Smart tagging sensing and control
149
Applications of smart systems technology
152
Conclusions
156
13 Facilities Management Service Providers
158
Preliminary approach
159
Types of service provision
160
Managing agent
161
Managing contractor
167
Managed budget
168
Evolution in the nature of service providers
169
Determining the best approach
171
Conclusions
172
14 Managing Service Provider and Supplier Relationships
174
Service providers and suppliers
175
What kind of relationship is needed?
177
Contractual arrangements and partnering
178
Gainsharing
180
15 Managing Specialist Services
182
Introduction
183
Health care services
187
Security and protection services
188
Custodial services
189
Performance and service level agreements
190
Risks insurance and indemnities
191
Conclusions
192
16 Information Systems Management
194
Information management
195
Planned preventive maintenance
200
Computeraided facilities management CAFM
202
Building information modelling
203
BIM applied to existing buildings
204
Conclusions
205
17 Contract Management and Financial Control
207
Contract conditions and terms
208
Cost monitoring
209
Performance monitoring
211
Change control
212
Contract review
213
18 Benchmarking Best Practice
215
Pursuing continual improvement
216
Benchmarking practices
217
Measuring performance
218
Benchmarking facilities management
220
Other kinds of benchmarking
222
Conclusions
226
19 PublicPrivate Partnerships
228
Introduction
229
Procurement and contractual approach
231
Main types of service provided
236
Facilities management and private sector participation
237
Output specifications
238
Risk and private investment
239
Problems with private investment and partnership
240
20 Education Training and Professional Development
242
Backgrounds of facilities managers
243
Growth of a professional discipline
244
Studying facilities management
245
Facilities management training and personal development
246
Continuing professional development CPD
247
The future for facilities managers
248
21 Innovation Research and Development
251
Change and innovation
252
Research and development themes
254
Healthy buildings promoting future living
257
Sustainable communities
261
Telecare in the home
264
Conclusions
267
Appendix A
269
Appendix B
283
Appendix C
289
Appendix D
291
Appendix E
295
References and Bibliography
296
Index
298
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Brian Atkin BSc, MPhil, PhD, FRICS, FCIOB has held various professorial appointments over the past decade including a number overseas. He is currently Director of Atkin Research & Development Ltd, specialising in technology transfer and studies of quality, performance and efficiency in the property, construction and engineering industries. His research and publications cover construction process improvement, project performance and the impact of cross-culture on major international projects. Brian is also Director of the Swedish national research and development programme, Competitive Building, and serves on other international advisory boards and committees for innovation and research centres and programmes.

Adrian Brooks BSc (Hons), MBA, MRICS is a chartered quantity surveyor with an MBA from the Cass Business School. He is the Director of Consulting for Acuity Management Solutions, a young and dynamic facilities management business, having held board positions in other property and facilities management businesses previously. Adrian continues to provide strategic advice to blue chip organisations internationally and is a regular speaker on best practice techniques and facilities issues.

Bibliographic information