Toussaint L'Ouverture: A Biography and Autobiography

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J. Redpath, 1863 - Generals - 372 pages
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VERY VERY VERY GOOOD

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Page 346 - TOUSSAINT, the most unhappy man of men! Whether the whistling Rustic tend his plough Within thy hearing, or thy head be now Pillowed in some deep dungeon's earless den; — O miserable Chieftain! where and when Wilt thou find patience? Yet die not; do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow: Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live, and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget...
Page 366 - I would call him Napoleon, but Napoleon made his way to empire over broken oaths and through a sea of blood. This man never broke his word. I would call him Cromwell, but Cromwell was only a soldier, and the state he founded went down with him into his grave. I would call him Washington, but the great Virginian held slaves.
Page 366 - I would call him Cromwell, but Cromwell was only a soldier, and the state he founded went down with him into his grave. I would call him Washington, but the great Virginian held slaves. This man risked his empire rather than permit the slave-trade in the humblest village of his dominions.
Page 367 - He stood upon the world's broad threshold; wide The din of battle and of slaughter rose; He saw God stand upon the weaker side, That sank in seeming loss before its foes: Many there were who made great haste and sold Unto the cunning enemy their swords, He scorned their gifts of fame, and power, and gold, And, underneath their soft and flowery words, Heard the cold serpent hiss; therefore he went And humbly joined him to the weaker part...
Page 346 - O miserable Chieftain ! where and when Wilt thou find patience ? Yet die not; do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow : Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live, and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee ; air, earth, and skies There 's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee ; thou hast great allies ; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.
Page 366 - You think me a fanatic to-night, for you read history, not with your eyes, but with your prejudices. But fifty years hence, when Truth gets a hearing, the Muse of History will put Phocion for the Greek...
Page 175 - Tell the people of St. Domingo, that " if liberty be to them the first of wants, they cannot enjoy it but with the title of French citizens."—" Rely without reserve on our esteem; and conduct yourself as one of the principal citizens of the greatest nation in the world ought to do.
Page 367 - He saw God stand upon the weaker side, That sank in seeming loss before its foes : Many there were who made great haste and sold Unto the cunning enemy their swords, He scorned their gifts of fame, and power, and gold, And, underneath their soft and flowery words, Heard the cold serpent hiss ; therefore he went And humbly joined him to the weaker part, Fanatic named, and fool, yet well content So he could be the nearer to God's heart, And feel its solemn pulses sending blood Through all the widespread...
Page 174 - Assist the Captain-General [Leclerc] with your counsels, your influence, and your talents. What can you desire?— the liberty of the blacks? You know that in all the countries where we have been, we have given it to the peoples who had it not.
Page 339 - French commissary, wrote a letter to Toussaint on this occasion, advising him to seize his guest as an act of duty to the Republic : on the route, General Maitland was secretly informed of Roume's treachery ; but, in full reliance on the honour of Toussaint, he determined to proceed. On arriving at headquarters, he was desired to wait.

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