Towards a Software Factory

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, May 31, 1992 - Computers - 177 pages
The subject of this book is the control of software engineering. The rapidly increasing demand for software is accompanied by a growth in the number of products on the market, as well as their size and complexity. Our ability to control software engineering is hardly keeping pace with this growth. As a result, software projects are often late, software products sometimes lack the required quality and the productivity improvements achieved by software engineering are insufficient to keep up with the demand This book describes ways to improve software engineering control. It argues that this should be expanded to include control of the development, maintenance and reuse of software, thus making it possible to apply many of the ideas and concepts that originate in production control and quality control. The book is based on research and experience accumulated over a number of years. During this period I had two employers: Eindhoven University of Technology and Philips Electronics. Research is not a one-man activity and I would like to thank the following persons for their contributions to the successful completion of this project. First and foremost my Ph. D. advisers Theo Bemelmans, Hans van Vliet and Fred Heemstra whose insights and experience proved invaluable at every stage. Many thanks are also due to Rob Kusters and Fred Heemstra for their patience in listening to my sometimes wild ideas and for being such excellent colleagues.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION OF THE PROBLEM
1
12 Importance of software engineering
3
13 Problems of software engineering
6
14 Definition of the problem
9
15 The Process Control Information model
10
16 Contents
12
WHY IS SOFTWARE LATE? Empirical studies of reasons for delay in software development
14
23 Definition and planning of the study
19
54 A parallel in software development
80
55 Reuse of software
84
56 Multiproduct control
86
57 A specific software factory
93
TOWARDS A SOFTWARE FACTORY
95
63 Steps towards the software factory
99
64 Summary and conclusions
102
INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONTROL AND PRODUCTION CONTROL
104

24 A systems software department
25
25 A diversified software development department
30
26 A CAD development project
31
27 Summary and conclusions
35
CHANGES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONTROL
37
33 Traditional control
39
34 Changes in software engineering and its control
42
35 Summary and conclusions
48
QUALITY AND MAINTENANCE towards product control
50
43 Quality definitions
53
44 Causes of increasing maintenance
59
45 A response to the maintenance problem
61
46 Consequences for control
67
47 Summary and conclusions
73
REUSE OF SOFTWARE towards multiproduct control
74
53 Reuse in industry
76
73 Comparison of the systems and assessment with respect to the software factory
113
74 Information systems in production control
117
75 Assessment with respect to the software factory
124
76 Summary and conclusions
128
A DATA MODEL FOR AN INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR MULTIPRODUCT CONTROL
130
83 A data model
133
84 A description of some entities
137
85 Use of the proposed data model
145
FIRST STEPS TOWARDS A SOFTWARE FACTORY
147
93 Two examples of data collection with regard to time and money
151
94 Two examples of data collection with regard to quality
154
CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
161
103 Recommendations for future research
164
REFERENCES
167
INDEX
175
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