Toxophilus: The School of Shooting, in Two Books

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John Russell Smith, 1866 - Archery - 168 pages
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Page 1 - Eighth, by the grace of God King of England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and of the Church of England, and also of Ireland, in earth the supreme head...
Page 14 - ... for the increase of learning as to let the land lie some time fallow, maketh for the better increase of corn. This we see, if the land be ploughed every year, the corn cometh thin up : the ear is short, the grain is small, and, when it is brought into the barn and threshed, giveth very evil fall.t So those which never leave poring on their books, have oftentimes as thin invention as other poor men have, and as small wit and weight in it as in other men's.
Page 7 - And as for the Latin or Greek tongue, everything is so excellently done in them that none can do better; in the English tongue, contrary, everything in a manner so meanly, both for the matter and handling, that no man can do worse.
Page 14 - So those which never leave poring on their books, have oftentimes as thin invention as other poor men have, and as small wit and weight in it as in other men's. And thus...
Page 155 - And that which was the most marvel of all, at one time two drifts of snow flew, the one out of the west into the east, the other out of the north into the east. And I saw two winds, by reason of the snow, the one cross over the other, as it had been two high ways.
Page 94 - Learning teacheth more in one year, than experience in twenty. Every craft and science standeth in two things : in knowing of his craft, and working of his craft, — for perfect knowledge bringeth a man to perfect working.
Page 14 - ... what he doth. And surely the best wits to learning must needs have much recreation, and ceasing from their book, or else they mar themselves, when base and dumpish wits can never be hurt with continual study ; as ye see in luting, that a treble minikin string must always be let down, but at such time as when a man must needs play, when the base and dull string needeth never to be moved out of his place.
Page 14 - I heard myself a good husband at his book once say, that to omit study some time of the day and some time of the year, made as much for the increase of learning as to let the land lie some time fallow, maketh for the better increase of corn.
Page 155 - For I should see one stream within a score on me, then the space of two score no snow would stir, but after so much quantity of ground, another stream of snow at the same very time should be carried likewise, but not equally. For the one would stand still when the other flew apace, and so continue sometime swiftlier, sometime slowlier, sometime broader, sometime narrower, as far as I could see. Nor it flew not straight, but sometime it crooked this way, sometime that way, and sometime it ran round...
Page 7 - He that will write well in any tongue, must follow this counsel of Aristotle, to speak as the common people do, to think as wise men do : and so should every man understand him, and the judgment of wise men allow him.

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