Trading Stories: Experiences with Gender and Trade

Front Cover
Marilyn Carr, Mariama Williams
Commonwealth Secretariat, 2010 - Law - 282 pages
0 Reviews
Through twenty regional and country case studies, Trading Stories pulls together the key links between trade, gender and economic development. Ten case studies focus on the gender impacts of trade policies, detailing differential consequences on men and women; and ten focus on linking women with global markets-including FairTrade, organic, niche and mainstream markets-through a range of best practices involving government, NGOs, people's organizations and associations, private sector and international agencies.

The book draws on three recent Commonwealth Secretariat publications on gender and trade: Gender Mainstreaming in the Multilateral Trading System; Chains of Fortune: Linking Women Producers and Workers with Global Markets; and Gender and Trade Action Guide and is a useful addition to the growing body of evidence that will help governments to effectively mainstream gender in their trade policy.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Import Liberalisation
9
Service Liberalisation
10
Gender Impacts of Trade
27
Preference Gain and Loss
41
India and the MFA Phaseout
55
The Effects of Changing Trade Regimes
75
GATS and the
89
The SPS Agreement and
117
Cocoa Farmers in Ghana
153
Indigenous Products in the Global
185
The Case of Ramesh Flowers in India
203
Women Artisans Exporting Leather
225
The Role of
243
Marilyn Carr
261
Figures
267
Copyright

Lessons Learned from Part One
133

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Marilyn Carr is a development economist with over thirty years experience working in Africa and Asia. She was Senior Economist for the Intermediate Technology Development Group (now Practical Action); Chief, Economic Empowerment, UNIFEM; and founding member and Director, Global Markets, WIEGO. Mariama Williams is an international economics consultant and an Adjunct Associate at the Centre of Concern, Washington, DC. She is also the Research Adviser for the International Gender and Trade Network.

Bibliographic information