Training Within Industry: The Foundation of Lean

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CRC Press, May 27, 2005 - Business & Economics - 352 pages
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Winner of a Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing Research

Training Within Industry, by Donald Dinero, explores a crucial piece of a Lean initiative that has been overlooked throughout U.S. industry. The Training Within Industry (TWI) program — developed by the United States during World War II — has been used by Toyota for decades! This powerful program standardizes training processes and assists front-line supervisors in teaching new operations to workers quickly and effectively.

Dinero completely explores the history and application of the four modules that compose TWI:Job Instruction — in which employees are trained to perform their tasks as quickly as they are capable with minimal waste; Job Methods — in which employees are taught how to improve their processes using existing resources; Job Relations — in which personnel problems are solved in an analytical, non-emotional manner so that employees are focused on a stated objective; and Program Development — in which robust training plans are developed to meet the particular needs of a specific plant.

Readers of Training Within Industry will see that standardized work imparts measurable continuous improvement because it sets a baseline. It establishes a framework for efficiency and innovation.

In addition, the book includes a CD containing the text of original TWI bulletins issued by the U.S. government in the 1940s. Unique and Compelling Features and Benefits:

  • Provides a key to successfully implementing Lean Thinking
  • Provides basic knowledge without any non-valued added material
  • Applies to all positions in all industries
  • Time tested - has been used for over sixty years and is still successful
 

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Contents

Benefits of the TWI Programs
3
Developing AllRound Skilled Craftsmen Through Apprenticeship
4
TWI is Not Just for Manufacturing
9
TWIA Precursor to the Learning Organization
16
Initial Startup Challenges
24
Expanding the Managerial Organization 6 Strengthening the Managerial Organization 7 How to Prepare Instructors to Give Intensive Job Instruction ...
28
Promotional Efforts
33
The J Programs
40
Further Adjustments to the PD Program After Release
143
Delivering the Method for Each Program
151
Commonality in the TWI Program Manuals
155
Job Instruction Session IIHow to Get Ready to Instruct
170
Using Job Demonstrations to Deliver JI Training
179
Three Special Instruction Problems
188
Job Relations Session I
197
Job Relations Session II
208

Why TWI Is A Foundation of Lean Thinking
47
Becoming Lean Requires a Culture Change
53
The Power of the J Programs
56
Simplicity Usability and Standardization
67
Usability
74
Summary of Essential TWI Characteristics
81
How TWI Developed the Job Instruction Program
87
Improving Job Breakdowns
102
How TWI Developed the Job Relations Program
109
Applying Job Relations to a Union Environment and Other Groups
119
Launch of the Job Methods ProgramJanuary 1942
125
Version VIIFinalized and First Printed Manual
131
How TWI Developed Program Development
137
Job Relations Session III
216
Job Relations Session V
222
Delivering Job Methods
227
Introducing the JM 4Step Method
237
End of Session I and Preparation for Session II
249
Using the Job Methods Plan
257
Delivering Program Development
265
Program DevelopmentSessions IIIX
280
Improving Supervisors Knowledge of the Work 24 Keeping Supervisors Informed About Their Responsibilities 25 How Training Can Be DoneMeth...
282
Using Program Development
287
Creation of a Governing Body
294
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