Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, Volumes 12-14

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The Society., 1876
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Page 128 - In the absence of the President, the Chair shall be taken by one of the Members of the Council in the following order ; viz.
Page 89 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to. another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man, who has iu philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking, can ever fall into it.
Page 140 - Treasurer-s notices, and collect subscriptions. The Treasurer shall receive all moneys paid to the Society, and shall deposit the same before the end of each month in the bank approved by the Council, to the credit of. an account opened in the name of the Royal Society of Victoria. The Treasurer shall make all payments ordered by the Council 0n receiving a written authority from the chairman of the meeting.
Page 48 - ... planetary system, and that the earth, itself a planet, revolves round the central fire; — who calculated, or like ourselves attempted to calculate, the return of comets, and who knew that these bodies move in elliptic orbits, immensely elongated, having the sun in one of their foci; — who indicated the number of the solar years contained in the great cycle, by multiplying a period (variously called in the Zend, the Sanscrit, and the Chinese ven, van, and phen) of 180 years by another period...
Page 4 - it is our own immediate consciousness of effort when we exert force to put matter into motion, or to oppose and neutralize force which gives us this internal conviction of power and causation, so far as it refers to the material world, and compels us to believe that whenever we see material objects put in motion ... or deflected if already in motion, it is in consequence of such an effort somehow exerted, though not accompanied with our consciousness.
Page 54 - Chinese reckon five planets, to the exclusion of the sun and moon ; but they give the name of one of their twentyeight lunar mansions, successively. to each day of the year in a perpetual rotation, without regard to the moon's changes ; so that the same four out of the twenty-eight invariably fall on our Sundays, and constitute, as it were, perpetual Sunday letters. A native Chinese first remarked this odd fact to the author, and on examination it proved perfectly correct.
Page 81 - The experimental results appear to me to point to the following conclusions. Whenever an elastic medium is between two vibrating bodies, or between a vibrating body and one at rest, and when the vibrations are dispersed in consequence of their impact on one or both of the bodies, the bodies will be urged together. The dispersion of a vibration produces a similar effect to that produced by the dispersion of the air-current in Clement's experiment, and, like the latter, the effect is due to the pressure...
Page 145 - Vice-Presidents, and the Treasurer for the time being, in trust for the use of the Society ; but the Council shall have full control over the expenditure of the funds and management of the property of the Society. XLVI. Every Committee appointed by the Society Coe™e™tlttees shall at its first meeting elect a Chairman, who shall Chairman.
Page 25 - ... adulterated air. Its absence from the air of towns and of large rooms, even in the country, is probably the chief cause of the difference which every one feels when he breathes the air of a town or of an apartment, however spacious, and afterwards inhales the fresh or ozone-containing air of the open country.

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