Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society

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University Press, 1827 - Science
 

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Page 213 - On the Determination of the General Term of a New Class of Infinite Series. BY CHARLES BABBAGE, ESQ. MA FELLOW OF THE ROYAL SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND EDINBURGH, AND OF THE CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. [Read May
Page 29 - computation falls below the truth; in consequence of the probable extension of the dyke to the NW through the Woodland Fells and Egglestone Burn to the banks of the Tees. Should this supposition be admitted, we shall have an uninterrupted dyke extending from High Teesdale to the confines of the eastern coast; a distance of more than sixty miles.
Page 45 - Take a bar " of antimony about eight inches long and half an inch thick, " connect its extremities by twisting a piece of brass wire round " them, so as to form a loop, each end of the bar having several " coils of the wire. If one of the extremities be heated a short " time by a spirit lamp, electro-magnetic phenomena may be
Page 28 - as a small rivulet about two miles to the east of the road. The exact point of its termination has perhaps not been ascertained; but there does not seem to be any good reason for supposing that it is continued to the German ocean; as no vestige of it has been seen in any part of the cliff
Page 132 - 5th, That when the direction of the wind concurs with that of the sound, the sum of their separate velocities gives the apparent velocity of sound; when the direction of the wind opposes that of the sound, the difference of the separate velocities must be taken.
Page 188 - that the great disturbing forces by which the crust of the globe has been modified, acted in former times with incomparably more energy than they do at present. Volcanic forces are now employed in lifting a column of melted lava to the
Page 133 - That in the case of echoes, the velocity of the reflected sound, is the same as that of the direct sound. 7th, That, therefore, distances may frequently be measured by means of echoes. 8th, That an augmentation of temperature occasions an augmentation of the velocity of sound ; and
Page 37 - that an enormous mass of strata has been rent asunder ; and it is probable that the rent has been prolonged to the extent of fifty or sixty miles. If we exclude volcanic agency, what power in nature is there capable of producing such an effect? By
Page 337 - que le véritable secret de l'analyse consistait dans l'art de saisir les divers degrés d'indétermination dont la quantité est susceptible; idée dont je fus toujours pénétré, et qui m'a fait
Page 268 - it would not be possible to see distinctly by the assistance of lenses with spherical surfaces. I found, indeed, that by turning a concave lens obliquely, or by looking directly through a part near the

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