Transactions of the Thoroton Society of Nottinghamshire, Volumes 18-19

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List of members in each volume.
 

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Page 73 - In London the three principal churches have celebrated schools of privilege and ancient dignity. Often, however, through personal favour to some noted philosopher more schools are allowed there. On feast days the masters celebrate assemblies at the churches, en fete. The scholars hold disputations, some declaiming, others by way of question and answer. These roll out enthymemes, those use the better form of perfect syllogisms. Some dispute merely for show as they do at collections ; others for truth,...
Page 75 - It may be stated with some confidence that at least in the later Middle Age the smallest towns and even the larger villages possessed schools where a boy might learn to read and acquire the first rudiments of ecclesiastical Latin : while, except in very remote and thinly populated regions he would never have had to go very far from home to find a regular Grammar School.
Page 72 - I go out at dawn, driving the oxen to the field, and I yoke them to the plough; however hard the winter I dare not stay at home for fear of my master; but, having yoked the oxen and made the plough-share and coulter fast to the plough, every day I have to plough a whole acre or more.
Page 106 - Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven ; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Page 45 - When it was time for them to go to school, both the brothers were sent to board with Mr. Theobalds, the master of the free school at Nottingham, who was an excellent scholar; but having no children, some wealth, and a little living that kept his house, he first grew lazy, and afterwards left off his school.
Page 78 - Nottingham, shall be for ever separated, distinct, divided, and in everything utterly exempt, as well by land as by water, from the same County from the fifteenth day of the month of September next to come, — our Castle of Nottingham and our messuage called 'the King's Hall,'1 wherein is our gaol for our Counties of Nottingham and Derby...
Page 74 - ... there. On feast days the masters celebrate assemblies at the churches, en fete. The scholars hold disputations, some declaiming, others by way of question and answer. These roll out enthymemes, those use the better form of perfect syllogisms. Some dispute merely for show as they do at collections, others for truth, which is the grace of perfection. The sophists using the Socratic irony are pronounced happy because of the mass and volume of their words ; others play upon words. Those learning...
Page 74 - Parisius. nothing that belongs to it. The boys of the different schools vie with each other in verses ; or dispute on the principles of grammar, or the rules of preterites and supines. Others in epigrams, rhymes and verses, use the old freedom of the highway, with Fescennine licence freely scourge their schoolfellows without mentioning names, hurl abuse and fun at each other, with Socratic wit gird at the failings of their schoolfellows, or even of their elders, or bite them more deeply with the...
Page 75 - ... looking on at the cock-fights in the morning, after which in the afternoon the whole youth of the city goes into the ' suburban level ', as he calls Smithfield, for ' a solemn game of ball ', presumably football. ' Each school has its own ball ' ; and nearly all the holders of civic offices each provide one. ' The grownup people, the fathers and rich men of the city, come on horseback to see the struggles of the young, and in a way grow young with them ' ; and get hot with excitement, by looking...
Page 86 - Efq; for that purpofe, and not in the market-place in the town, and county of the town of Nottingham, and out of the county at large, and thereby prevented their fpoiling the fine' profpect of that large and fpacious market-place.

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