Transatlantic Conversations: Feminism as Travelling Theory

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Kathy Davis, Mary Evans
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2011 - Social Science - 237 pages
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Examining the meaning and implications of the different ways in which various shared categories have been treated on both sides of the Atlantic, this volume both analyses differences within feminism and provides a framework for the wider discussion of what is sometimes assumed to be the homogeneity of the West.
 

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Contents

Feminism as Travelling Theory
1
Becoming a Feminist in a Transatlantic Context
13
A Feminist Transatlantic Education
15
Crossings
23
My Father an Agent of State Feminism and Other Unrelatable Conversations
33
Bridging Different Gaps East West Europe and the USA?
41
Activism Inside and Outside the Academy
53
Renarrating Feminist Stories Black British Women and Transatlantic Feminisms
55
Chronos and Knowledge A Target of the Feminist Agenda Today
101
Passages to Feminism Encounters and Rearticulations
115
Theoretical Engagements
125
There are Many Transatlantics Homonationalism Homotransnationalism and FeministQueerTrans of Colour Theories and Practices
127
Often Whats Not Said is Just as Important as What Is Transnational Feminist Encounters
145
On Not Engaging with Whats Right in Front of Us Or Race Ethnicity and Gender in Reading Womens Writing
157
Visions of Legacy Legacies of Vision
167
Feminist Travels A Historical and Textual Journey
183

Floating Signifiers and Fluid Identities Feminist and Other Queer Travels
69
Writing in the Dark Reflections on Becoming a Feminist
79
Is there a Feminist in this Class? Academic Feminism and its Generations across the Atlantic
93
Constellations Conversations Three Stories
201
Epilogue
219
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Kathy Davis is Senior Research Fellow at the Vrije University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Mary Evans is a Visiting Professor at the Gender Institute, London School of Economics, UK.

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