Transformations in Slavery: A History of Slavery in Africa

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 28, 2000 - History - 367 pages
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This history of African slavery from the fifteenth to the early twentieth century examines how indigenous African slavery developed within an international context. Professor Lovejoy discusses the medieval Islamic slave trade and the Atlantic trade as well as the enslavement process and the marketing of slaves. He considers the impact of European abolition and assesses slavery's role in African history. The book corrects the accepted interpretation that African slavery was mild and resulted in the slaves' assimilation. This new edition incorporates recent research, revised statistics on the slave trade demography, and an updated bibliography.
 

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Contents

Africa and Slavery
1
Slavery in Social Formations
9
The African Setting
12
The Islamic Factor
15
The TransAtlantic Trade
18
On the Frontiers of Islam 14001600
24
The Institution of Slavery in Muslim Africa
29
The Muslim Connection
36
The TransSaharan and Red Sea Trade
152
The East African Trade
155
The Internal Trade
158
Slavery and Legitimate Trade on the West African Coast
165
The Western Coast and Asante
167
Dahomey and the Yoruba States
176
The Bight of Biafra
182
Slavery in the Savanna During the Era of the Jihads
191

Slavery Along the Guinea Coast
41
The Export Trade in Slaves 16001800
46
The Dominance of WestCentral Africa
53
The Bight of Benin 16401800
55
The Gold Coast
57
The Bight of Biafra
59
The Upper Guinea Coast and Senegambia
60
The Volume of the Trade Across the Sahara Red Sea and Indian Ocean
61
Demographic Implications of the Export Trade
62
The Enslavement of Africans 16001800
68
The Muslim Tradition of War and State
70
WarLords of WestCentral Africa
76
Politics of Slave Trading on the West African Coast
80
The Dynamics of Slave Supply
86
The Organization of Slave Marketing 16001800
91
Administered Trade in WestCentral Africa
95
State Trade RiverBoats and Oracles
98
Patterns in Restrictive Practices
104
Slaves and Other Commodities
105
The Import Trade
106
Relationships of Dependency 16001800
112
The Northern Savanna
115
The West African Coast and Its Interior
120
Slavery in WestCentral Africa
127
European Slavery in Africa
133
The NineteenthCentury Slave Trade
140
The Last Surge
145
The Volume of the NonSlave Trade
151
The Western Sudan
194
The Central Sudan
201
The Region East of Lake Chad
208
The Organization of the Plantation Sector
212
Slavery in the Sahel
216
Assimilation of Slaves
220
Slavery on the Periphery
224
Slavery in Central Southern and Eastern Africa in the Nineteenth Century
226
The OmaniSwahili Sector
229
The SouthEastern Coast and the Lake Malawi Corridor
233
The Portuguese Enclaves in WestCentral Africa
237
Apprenticeship in South Africa
238
Expansion of an Indigenous Slave Mode of Production
240
The Limited Transformation of Lineage Slavery
245
The Abolitionist Impulse
252
The Colonial Occupation of the Western Coast
254
Christian Missions in Central and East Africa
262
The Imperialist Justification of Islamic Slavery
267
Slavery in the Political Economy of Africa
276
The Transformation of Slavery
281
Articulation with Capitalism
283
The Legacy of Slavery
287
Chronology of Measures Against Slavery
290
Notes
295
Bibliography
318
Index
355
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About the author (2000)

Paul E. Lovejoy is a Distinguished Research Professor at York University, Toronto and holds the Canada Research Chair in African Diaspora History. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, director of the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples and a member of the UNESCO 'Slave Route' Project. Lovejoy's recent publications include Repercussions of the Atlantic Slave Trade (2010) and Slavery, Islam and Diaspora (2009). He is the editor of the Harriet Tubman Series on the African Diaspora for Africa World Press. He has received several awards, including an honorary doctorate from the University of Stirling in 2007, the President's Research Award of Merit from York University in 2009 and the Distinguished Africanist Award from the University of Texas, Austin in 2010.

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